An 'Underworld' Discovered Beneath Mexico's Teotihuacan Ruins

The tunnel reinforces researchers' belief that the theme of life and death was constant throughout the Teotihuacan culture.

The National Institute of Anthropology announced its discovery of a tunnel beneath Mexico’s Teotihuacan Temple.

RELATED: ‘Mummified Humanoid’ Found in Peru Raises ‘Alien’ Claims

The INAH stated Tuesday that by using a computerized topographical instrument they discovered a tunnel 10 meters below the pyramid's front plaza.

The group of archaeologists who have been searching since last year for the ancient serpentine passageways deep beneath the pyramid, call it an “emulation of the underworld.”

"We are seeing that underneath the great monuments of the archaeological zone there are previous buildings. We have seen it under the pyramids of the Sun and the Feathered Serpent, why not under the Pyramid of the Moon?" lead archaeologist Veronica Ortega stated.

For years, researchers have found traces of burials and offerings within sacred spaces in the Pyramid of the Moon, which are absent from the other structures such as the Sun and the Feathered Serpent.

“Those of the Pyramid of the Moon have an enormous advantage for our study of symbolism and the function of the ritual spaces: for the first time in the history of Teotihuacan archeology complexes of burials and offerings are detected at the height of a construction of great proportions,” archaeologists Saburo Sugiyama and Leonardo Lopez Lujan wrote.

Anthropologists hope that the discovery of the tunnel may shed some light on the incredible builders who are responsible for some of Latin America’s archaeological treasures such as the pyramids of the Sun, the Moon, Quetzalcoatl, and the Feathered Serpent.

“They are, as always, unknowns, mysteries that archaeologists, detectives of space-time, are slowly revealing,” the pair of researches continued to say.

Up until now, life among the ancient Tenochtitlan tribe who occupied the land between 100 BC to AD 750 was shrouded in mystery. A community of over 100,000 people vanished without a trace, with researches left to speculate at the reasoning for the abandonment of their famous structures. Their customs, rulers, and beliefs all lost completely.

"Almost the entire population of the valley - some 70 kilometers north of present-day Mexico City - lived there in the big city. It was organized like a grid. Most of the population lived in houses well enough built to call them palaces," Hungarian archaeologist Ester Pasztory wrote in a book on the Teotihuacan people. Pasztory has dedicated years studying the subject.

The tunnels running beneath the other pyramids reinforce researchers’ belief that the theme of life and death was constant throughout the Teotihuacan culture.

“The fact that the tunnel was sealed by the Teotihuacans themselves would give them the opportunity to find new evidence of ritual organization, but also sociopolitical, so it will be necessary to make comparisons between this possible conduit and those that run under the Pyramid of the Sun and the Temple of the Feathered Serpent, in search of a better understanding of the meaning of the city," Ortega explained.

  • Published in Culture

Designer’s Melancholic, Dazzling Collection Fights Brexit Hate

“I feel like the whole world is turning so fucking right wing ... I think that as … people who work in the creative industry, we all need to … really fight back," said the designer.

Ashish Gupta’s shows are usually a phantasmagorical display of sartorialism, with sequined splendor and kaleidoscopic color. But his platform at London Fashion Week this season was a tad more somber.

RELATED: Louboutin Designs Uniforms for Cuba's Olympic Athletes

With a collection titled “Bollywood Bloodbath,” the British-Indian designer wanted to bring attention to post-Brexit xenophobia, highlighting the resplendence of multiculturalism through his clothes and diverse cast of models.

"I wanted to celebrate Indian culture in England," Gupta told Refinery29. "I was absolutely horrified by Brexit. It broke my heart. And I wanted to make a statement about that. (I wanted to) celebrate this culture, which is so beautiful, and such an integral part of life in this country."

"After 20 years of living in this country, I felt like 'Oh, am I actually unwelcome here?' I just felt really awful about it," he told i-D backstage

The show commenced with the performance of a blind sitar player whose stirring live performance built to a crescendo as a male model emerged in a glittering golden dress, a python draped over his shoulders.

With gender fluidity a core feature, a slew of models sporting "traditional" Indian fabrics cut in "Western" silhouettes came out one by one, wearing sequined tracksuits, double denim, slip dresses and saris.

RELATED: Navajo Nation Designer: Support Us, Not Racist Urban Outfitters

"There was a slightly heartbroken vibe about (the collection), with the reds, pinks, and muted golds and greens. They were celebratory colors, popped in with solemn palettes," the designer said about his collection. The melancholy of the show was also displayed through tears drawn on the models’ faces.

With an all-Black model cast during his Spring/Summer 2015 show, Gupta followed in that trajectory with his casting this year as well, which included the British model of Indian descent Neelam Gill, Sri-Lankan born Londoner Suren Seneviratne, Colombian model Ricardo Dominguez and the New-York-based queer artist of West Indian descent Richie Shazam.

Commenting on the predominance of white models in the industry, he said, "I suppose it’s an artistic decision, I’m not one to comment on other people’s aesthetic or casting decisions. It’s a choice everyone is free to take, but my view is that we live in such a diverse world that I don’t understand how the view of beauty can be so narrow. I think that fashion is meant to be aspirational. If you have all white girls on the runway, what does that say about people’s aspirations? I think that’s quite shocking."

"I know it's just fashion, but I think it's really important to not just have this narrow version of beauty," he added. "I think there's such a big battle to be fought right now because I feel like the whole world is turning so fucking right wing. It really frightens me, and I think that as artists, as journalists, people who work in the creative industry, we all need to gather force and really fight back against that".

  • Published in Culture

British Rapper Lowkey Dedicates Show to Chile's 9/11 Victims

The rapper told teleSUR he wanted to use his music to highlight the victims of Chile’s coup, not the ones fallen at the center of power in the U.S.

A global order that promotes elite narrative is why the victims of September 11, 2001 get most of the global recognition and coverage while the tens of thousands who lost their lives as a result of the U.S.-backed military coup in Chile in 1973 on that same date get sidelined and ignored, British-Iraqi rapper Lowkey told teleSUR in an interview Sunday.

OPINION: Chile's 1973 Coup and Barack Obama’s Selective Memory on 9/11

“I think the reason for the discrepancy in the depiction of the loss of life that took place on Sept. 11, 2001 in contrast to Sept. 11, 1973 is linked to the global order and elite narrative which props that up and maintains it,” Lowkey told teleSUR ahead of a performance in London where he highlighted the 1973 coup in Chile against socialist President Salvador Allende.

“So when we look at the example of Chile we have a democratically-elected president who was working for the nationalizing of the copper and for the protection of his country’s sovereignty and I think it is not often we see that story and the victims within that story are sidelined for the victims of the center of power.”

Lowkey is making a comeback after being absent from the public eye for the past five years. He will headline 13 performances across the U.K. where he will highlight social issues.

His performance Sunday was to “give our respect to the progressive movement that has carried on” since the 1973 coup in Chile, “which was based on the work that was done by Salvador Allende and his collaborators at the time.”

Lowkey said his music aims “to recognize these marginalized and sidelined parts of the story and those who were victims of the overall global order.”

But Lowkey’s respect for Chile goes beyond a professional nod as he sees Allende’s life and work as an example for all generations.

IN DEPTH: 9/11: A Tale of Two Attacks

"On a personal level, I find Salvador's life inspiring from the fact that this is someone who discovered the difficulties which everyday Chileans were facing through his work as a doctor,” the rapper said of the late president.

Watching over thousands of the poor and marginalized during his time as a physician, Allende “really saw the true destruction neoliberalism was reeking over society and wanted to build a democratic and revolutionary alternative to this order that was imposed upon the Chilean people.”

Music is the way to reclaim the history of the underdog and sidelined, Lowkey stressed, and it is artists’ duty “to continue to assert our identities and assert our independence as much as we can.”

  • Published in Culture

Actor Rich List Reveals Inherent Gender and Racial Inequality

The top 10 highest paid actors earned a combined total of US$464.5 million, compared to US$205 million for the top 10 women combined.

A list of the world's highest paid actresses was released on Tuesday by Forbes, revealing the large gender and race pay gap within Hollywood.

ANALYSIS: The Gender-Wage Gap is Holding US Women Back

Jennifer Lawrence was the highest earning actress with US$46 million before tax, eclipsing the US$33 million earned by Melissa McCarthy over the last year.

But compared to actors, Lawrence's paycheck seems modest. For the third consecutive year, Robert Downey Jr. topped hollywood's richest, as he was paid US$80 million over the same period. Second ranked Jackie Chan was measured to earn US$50 million.

You have to go down to number four on the actors list to Bradley Cooper with US$41.5 million to find a male that is paid less than the top-earning actress.

Together, the world’s 10 highest-paid actors earned a combined total of US$64.5 million. But the top 10 women were only paid US$205 million combined. Forbes estimated that 90 percent of the world’s top paid actresses still supplement their on-screen pay with advertising endorsements.

From the actress list, 30 percent of the top earners came from outside the U.S., with Chinese actress Fan Bingbing coming in at number five with US$17 million and Indian Bollywood star, Deepika Padukone, listed tenth with US$10 million.

RELATED: #BlackWomen Equal Pay Highlights Race-Gender Wage Gap

From more than 11,000 on screen characters, only 33.5 percent were female. Actresses filled only 28.7 percent of all speaking roles in films, according to research from the Institute of Diversity and Empowerment at Annenberg, IDEA.

Female minority groups were also more likely to be sexualized than white actresses. Out of Forbes’ top 10 list no African-American or Latina women were included.

Pay inequality exists perhaps even more so in general society. In the U.S., women made only 70 percent of men’s salaries and white men earned almost twice as much as Latina women.

  • Published in Culture
Subscribe to this RSS feed