Guevarist times

The encampment of thousands of people, mainly youngsters from all over the world, at Vallegrande, Bolivia, very close to the place where Che Guevara passed to immortality, symbolizes the ever-lasting influence and need in the world of the example and ideas of the Cuban-Argentinean revolutionary. Among those encamped was President Evo Morales, main organizer of the dozens of cultural and political activities that have been held there to recall the heroic guerrilla half a century after his fall in combat and subsequent assassination ordered by the CIA. Along with Evo were Che’s children and brother Roberto, as well as Commander Ramiro Valdés Menéndez, a heavyweight within Cuban leadership and close comrade of Guevara in the Sierra Maestra, the invasion of the West and the Battle of Santa Clara.

It could have been very hard for a revolutionary Indian to reach the presidency and refound Bolivia without the antecedent of Che’s guerrilla, the moral example he laid down, and the cycle of popular struggles that he inspired from then on in the territory of what is today a Plurinational State. Together with Bolivia, Venezuela, Ecuador and Cuba too are living experiences of social transformation in which the fresh and renovating thinking of Che is evident. But in many other places in the world, popular struggles find incentives in that thinking and example.

The fervor that Che arouses in Neozapatism, in the universities of Latin America and among young people across the planet is well-known.

Che spoke in Cuba last October 8th through the speech of its First Vice-President Miguel Díaz-Canel, who evoked the validity of his thinking before the mausoleum, where his remains rest, and remarked, as essential in Cuba’s foreign policy, that unforgettable phrase by the guerrilla fighter at the UN General Assembly, in which he warned that “We cannot trust imperialism in the tiniest bit, absolutely nothing”. Díaz-Canel outlines the difficult and uncertain situation humanity is facing with the new forms of accumulation of neoliberal capitalism, the military interventions, the attempts of cultural colonization and standardization, the danger of a nuclear war and climate change as a threat to the survival of mankind. In a guevarist-tone speech he stressed Cuba’s internationalist policy and in the face of the threats and sanctions against Venezuela reiterated "The unconditional solidarity of Cuba toward the Bolivarian and Chavista people, their civic-military union, and the government headed by constitutional president, comrade Nicolás Maduro Moros".

The island’s first vice-president underlined that faithful to the legacy of Fidel and Che “Cuba will not make concessions essential to its sovereignty and independence, nor will it negotiate its principles or accept conditions. The changes needed in Cuba are solely being decided by the Cuban people”.

It’s pertinent to recall at present that Guevara, who wrote in his Bolivian diary on the 14th anniversary of the attack on Moncada Barracks, “Rebellion against oligarchies and revolutionary dogmas”, granted exceptional significance to the study of the revolutionary theory in its original sources. To its permanent enrichment by means of the critical analysis of the reality that is being transformed. To the generation of a new socialist and communist awareness called to be built and surpassed daily in the revolutionary practice. To the indomitable will of struggle with the greatest attachment to principles.

To unprejudiced unity of all real revolutionaries regardless of their initials or labels of origin and to the free exercise of internationalism, indispensable requirements as much to the overthrow of capitalism as the rise of the people to the political power, and the construction of the new society.

Along with Fidel, he stood out in his practice as one of the leaders of the Cuban revolution and in the study of the experiences prior to the road to the elaboration of a veritable theory of the socialist construction, almost nonexistent when Cuba embraced that hope. The self-transformation of the human being into a “new man” as core aim of socialism and the main role of the will to produce and speed up the revolutionary transformations are probably the most valuable contributions to the revolutionary thinking of these two great men of all time.

Twitter:@aguerraguerra

Translated by Jorge Mesa Benjamin / Cubasi Translation Staff

 

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Che Family Members Arrive in Bolivia for 50th Anniversary of His Death

Arriving with Cuban Government Vice President Ramiro Valdes, Ernesto "Che" Guevara’s four children will be attending the events in homage to the fallen revolutionary on the 50th anniversary of his execution.

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The ceremonies will also include Che’s younger brother Ramiro Guevara, Venezuelan Vice President Tarek el Aissami, Cuban ex-guerillas Harry Villegas and Leonardo Tamayo, both of whom fought alongside Che during the Cuban Revolution and in his last campaign in Bolivia.

Villegas told reporters that returning to Bolivia 50 years after Che's murder brought back a wave of "very strong memories." This will be Tamayo's fourth visit to the country.

Bolivian President Evo Morales, who recently was compared to the Argentine revolutionary by activists around the world for their contributions to the socialist movement, will lead a procession to La Higuera, the town where Che was executed by the Bolivian military on Oct. 9, 1967, a day after being captured leading a guerrilla campaign in the South American country.

The ceremonies, which kicked off Oct. 5, have included debates, forums, films, cultural activities, as well as demonstrations from the arts and literary community, commemorating Che's memory and his contribution to Latin America.

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An inspiring ceremony held in Cuba early Sunday, led by President Raul Castro Ruz, paid homage to one of the leaders of the Cuban Revolution and attracted over 600,000 people to his monument and mausoleum in Santa Clara.

In Ireland, a postage stamp was launched in honor of Che in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of his death.

Known for his passionate and honest nature, Che earned the rank of commander and played a pivotal role in the victory of the Cuban Revolution, leading a column of fighters in the crucial battle of Santa Clara.

He served as minister of economics and supervised a massive land reform process on the island before he decided to continue the guerrilla struggle in Bolivia aimed at overthrowing the right-wing military regime of Rene Barrientos

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Che Guevara, survival

It is incredible how most of the immediate testimonies to the fall of Che Guevara in La Higuera, that October 1967, and the expressions coming from all latitudes in solidarity with Cuba and the pain of its people, spoke about sadness but especially, survival.

I find it incredible because I figure out that the misery of that time must have been great, the feeling of emptiness, the irreparable loss, and however certainty was unanimous: intellectuals, in the midst of their grief, clearly sensed that Che had not been killed, that there was a second birth of man for Latin America and the world.

In that sense, a phrase especially overwhelms me, that of Rodolfo Walsh when he writes: "Sooner or later someone will get the hell out of this continent. It will not be Che's memory, that now is scattered in one hundred cities. "And it is that the Commander had delivered during his life, as Lezama Lima says, "the terrible and magnificent tests of his size for transfiguration". A transfiguration and a myth that conservatives try to steal, re-write, reconfigure and sell today. To make him sterile, impossible to reach. It is the way to smash that October, a bet on forgetfulness, banalization, boredom.

And since he does not fall from a quick death, then let him die slowly in the market of ideas and reality. This is how we have seen him in T-shirts and cheap goods, movies and posters, but I want to think that much of his example remains in those who buy or watch the merchandise; which rather than a fashion is a motive, a trigger. At least it is my impression after reading these words by Rigoberta Menchú: "Like many people from my country, my first knowledge of Che was more for his image and symbolism than for his writings and his work.”And it is the same security when I look at my contemporaries, star dreamers, Quixotes, who know that immobility would be Che's real death.

Then it is not unreasonable to reiterate Cortazar's invocation in those sad, seed-like days: "I ask for the impossible thing, the most undeserved thing, what I dared to do once, when he lived: I ask that it be his voice that appears here, that it is his hand that writes these lines. I know it is absurd and it is impossible, and that's why I think he writes this with me, because no one knew better how the absurd and the impossible thing will one day be the reality of men, the future whose conquest he gave his young and wonderful life for. Then use my hand once again my brother, it has been worthless to cut off your fingers, it has been worthless to kill you and hide you with their clumsy tricks. Take, write: what is left for me to say and do, I will always say it and will do it with you by my side. Only then will it make sense to go on living ".

Translated by Jorge Mesa Benjamin / Cubasi Translation Staff

Tribute for Che's 50-Year Presence in Bolivia

La Paz, Sep 4 (Prensa Latina) Bolivia has officially opened -with songs, revolutionary poems and touching speeches- the international meeting for the 50th anniversary of the presence of Ernesto Che Guevara in this South American country.

In the opening ceremony of the event, the Minister of Culture, Wilma Alanoca, invited all Bolivians and social, cultural and civil society organizations from abroad, to participate in the cultural activities to be held in the municipality of Vallegrande, department of Santa Cruz, from tomorrow through Monday.

Despite the 50 years passed, Che's thought is more alive than ever and touches the full sensitivity of those who live and feel this process of change, said Alanoca referring to the Democratic Cultural Revolution of Bolivia, which began in 2006.

In addition, she highlighted the human values bequeathed by Che, his thoughts, the way of working for the benefit of the fellow men and friend, the anti-imperialist struggle and for the brotherhood and liberation of the peoples, as well as the tirelessly search for social justice.

In this regard, Che's ideology coincides with the economic and social policies promoted by Bolivian President Evo Morales. She recalled that the process of change is a hard struggle to wipe out discrimination, inequality and poverty.

She urged Bolivians to follow the example of the revolutionary leader, a disciplined human being who had a unwavering loyalty, the ability to love the other as himself and to have an incorruptible consciousness. How much did Che sacrifice? How much did Che devote himself to around the world? That's why Che is still living in our minds and hearts, and in our daily actions, Wilma asserted and stressed that Che's thought will remain forever as long as the people hold unity, love and solidarity.

Dulce Chazaro, member of the Ernesto Che Guevara Free Department in Mexico, and Bolivian journalist and historian Carlos Soria agreed with the ideas and teachings of Che after 50 years of his death to build Latin America.

The Cuban historians and writers Froilan Arencibia and Adys Cupull recalled the whole process they followed to reconstruct the facts closely related to Ñancahuazú guerrilla and how important it would be for for the revolutionary process in Bolivia.

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Some 11,000 Patients Treated in Two Days of Health Fair in Bolivia

About 11,000 free medical consults have been provided by Cuban collaborators and their Bolivian colleagues in the first two days of the Cochabamba Tropic Health Fair, which ends today.

The most demanded specialties so far are Comprehensive General Medicine, Ophthalmology, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Gynecology, Orthopedics and Traumatology, Allergology, Otorhinolaryngology and Dermatology.

Thousands of low-income people from Cochabamba regions come here to receive free high-quality medical care offered by collaborators from the Cuban Medical Brigade in Bolivia and professionals from the local Ministry of Health.

Boosted by the government of President Evo Morales, the initiative is aimed at bringing medical services closer to the residents in faraway communities.

Since Friday, August 18, patients suffering from cataract and other eye diseases have also been treated, the medicines prescribed are also free of charge.

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Bolivia's President Winds UP Working Visit to Cuba

Bolivia''s President Evo Morales wound up a state visit to Cuba after meeting First Vice President Miguel Diaz Canel, his last activity of his agenda in the island.

In the encounter, Morales was accompanied by his Foreign Minister Fernando Huanacuni, the Cuban Television prime news hour reported.

The Bolivian Head of State was seen off at Havana international airport Jose Marti by Diaz Canel personally. He's flying to Mendoza, Argentina, to attend a Mercosur gathering.

Morales arrived in Cuba on Wednesday evening from Managua, Nicaragua, where he attended celebrations for the 38th Anniversary of the Sandinista Revolution and took part at the 23rd Meeting of the Sao Paula Forum, in which he reaffirmed his solidarity with Cuba and Venezuela.

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Bolivia's Evo Calls US 'Military Empire,' Slams US-Chile Naval Operations

The maneuvers, which began on July 1, include anti-terrain and anti-submarine operations.

Bolivian President Evo Morales slammed the joint naval operations between the U.S. and Chile, called Teamwork South 2017, which started off the coast of Chile Saturday.

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Calling Chile the "Cain of South America" on Twitter, the Bolivian president said Sunday the "(U.S.) military empire" and the "small Israel of South America" are training to continue invading peaceful peoples.

"Joint maneuvers Teamwork South 2017: When brothers learn kill together," Morales said in a tweet, adding, "USA-Chile with naval operations Teamwork South 2017: Colonies learning from their masters."

@evoespueblo Imperio militar y el pequeño Israel de Sudamérica entrenando para seguir invadiendo pueblos pacíficos.

@evoespueblo EEUU-Chile con operaciones navales Teamwork South 2017: Las colonias aprendiendo de sus amos.

TWS-17 is a bi-annual Chile-United States naval exercise that conducts training sessions in "intermediate and advanced anti-surface and anti-submarine warfare operations," the U.S. navy's website stated.

The maneuvers, which began on July 1, include anti-terrain and anti-submarine operations. Some fleets and equipment involved in TWS-17 exercises are from the United States Southern Command Naval Forces Fourth Fleet along with the destroyer USS Chafee (DDG90), that will carry two helicopters, a fast attack submarine, and two P-8A Orion aircraft. The Destroyer 40 Squadron and the Combined Task Force 46 are also involved.

The relationship between La Paz and Santiago has been tense since Chile invaded Bolivia in 1879, taking nearly 250 miles of its coast and 74,500 square miles of its rich mineral territories. This conflict between the two countries is currently at the International Court of Justice in the Hague.

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Venezuela to Send Troops to Train at Bolivia’s ‘Anti-Imperialist’ Military Academy

The school is seen as the anti-School of the Americas, which the U.S. used to train Latin American soldiers in torture and counterinsurgency methods.

Venezuela will send troops to train at Bolivia’s "anti-imperialist" military academy, the country's defense minister announced Monday.

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"I have been instructed by Mr. Pdte @ NicolasMaduro to send FANB military professionals to train in Bolivia's Anti-imperialist School," Venezuelan Defense Minister Vladimir Padrino Lopez announced on his Twitter account.

The announcement came shortly after Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro met briefly with Bolivian President Evo Morales at the airport in Maiquetía, Venezuela, with Morales en route to New York for the U.N. Oceans summit.

Morales expressed his solidarity with Maduro, as Venezuela continues to suffer from political turmoil and sometimes violent anti-government protests that have resulted in the deaths of at least 73 people since April.

The Juan José Torres Anti-Imperialist School was created in November 2015, but officially opened in August of last year. Soldiers from Venezuela’s National Bolivarian Armed Forces, known by its Spanish acronym FANB, will attend the school that seeks to change the "repressive and imperialist" doctrines of military entities.

“We want to build anti-colonial and anti-capitalist thinking with this school that binds the armed forces to social movements and counteracts the influence of the School of the Americas that always saw the indigenous as internal enemies,” said Morales at the opening of the school.

The School of the Americas, later renamed the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation, was started during the Cold War to provide "anti-communist counterinsurgency training" to soldiers from U.S.-allied right-wing nations. Its graduates have gone on to be dictators, war criminals and death squad members, with notorious alumni including former Guatemalan dictator Efrain Rios Montt, Salvadoran death squad leader Roberto D'Aubuisson, and former Bolivian dictator Hugo Banzer Suarez. In 1996 the New York Times, in an editorial titled the "School of Dictators," revealed that the school taught torture.

"A training manual recently released by the Pentagon recommended interrogation techniques like torture, execution, blackmail and arresting the relatives of those being questioned," the newspaper reported.

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The "anti-imperialist" school was built as a political and ethical commitment to the country and teaches history, geopolitics and military strategy. It also prepares pupils in the specialties of piloting, air defense and operational support.

Last week, Morales delivered a new Jatun Puma helicopter and two Cessna aircrafts to the military school and announced plans for more training aircraft to train cadets and officers of the Bolivian Air Force.

“All this is possible because we have changed the economic model of our country, thanks to the struggle of social movements,” Morales said.

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