Trump: Between the Hatred and Love of Many

The opinion poll results don't have the last word, although they do give some signs impossible to ignore.

A survey published this Sunday by The Washington Post and the ABC television network repeat the Donald Trump’s edge for the coming 2020 elections.

The approval rate rises to 47%, "the highest since he took office at the White House."

This supports the work the president is doing from the White House, and it supposes an increment since April, when 42% affirmed the same.

However, the investigation also reveals that half of registered voters disapprove Donald Trump’s form of governing.

Also, 65% of interviewed considers that he acts in a way "that is not common in the president of the United States."

At the same time, only 28% believes that he behaves in a "suitable and appropriate manner".

However, according to the interpretation of the Post, the survey shows that Trump has a "narrow path" that could take him to be reelected in the coming elections.

There is a very important lesson here, it would be mistaken to apply on the North American society the same scale of values than to other societies.

When the president acts in an extremely severe fashion against Central American immigrants it causes the applause of those who support him.

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Besides causing exasperation among those who favor to aid the human rights.

And that shows its results in public opinion polls.

It helps to understand that more than 50% of the consulted North Americans have a positive approach on measures executed by Trump whose outcome has benefitted the full employment.

Nevertheless, 42% rejects his administration and last October figures went to 46%.

When asked on how much trust Trump deserved for the patched health of his economy, 47% responded that "mostly", while the 48% affirmed that "only a little" or "almost nothing."

At the same time, in the foreign policy area, between 40-55% of the consulted North Americans have a negative opinion about it.

The survey was elaborated through phone interviews between June 28th and last July 1st.

At present there isn’t a fairly believable prognosis on the direction that will follow the 2020 elections.

Conservatives Beat Tsipras in Greece Elections: Exit Polls

Two exit polls gave conservative New Democracy a commanding lead of between 38 and 42 percent of the vote, suggesting an outright majority in Greece's parliament.

Greece's opposition conservatives were on track to return to power by a landslide Sunday, exit polls suggested.

Two exit polls gave conservative New Democracy a commanding lead of between 38 and 42 percent of the vote, suggesting an outright majority in Greece's parliament.

One of the exit polls showed New Democracy, led by opposition leader Kyriakos Mitsotakis, winning between 155 and 167 seats in the 300 member parliament. It showed ruling Syriza coming second with between 26.5 and 30.5 percent of the vote.

Sunday's poll was the first national election since the country shook off close scrutiny by its European partners who loaned Greece billions in three bailouts. Incumbent Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras signed up to the latest, in 2015, in return for potential debt relief.

"The basic reason (for the result) is the economy," said analyst Theodore Couloumbis. "In the past 4.5 years people saw no improvement, on the contrary, there were cutbacks in salaries and pensions," he said.

The snap election was called after Syriza suffered a defeat in European elections in May.

Greece endured a debilitating financial crisis from 2010 that required three cash lifelines from its European Union partners. The economy is the public's main concern, said Thomas Gerakis of pollsters MARC.

Tsipras said a vote cast for Mitsotakis would go to the political establishment, which forced Greece to the edge of the precipice in the first place.

While economic growth has returned, Greek unemployment of 18 percent is the euro zone's highest.

New Democracy has promised to invest in creating well-paid jobs with decent benefits. The outgoing government meanwhile hopes voters will reward it for upping the minimum wage by 11 percent and reinstating collective bargaining.

Its leader has promised to lower taxes and social security contributions, maintain aid to the needy, attract foreign private investments and create a "rampant" economy.

  • Published in World

More Than 40,000 Women Candidates in Mexican Elections

More than 40,000 women appear today as candidates for the July 1 elections in Mexico, and they did not escape from the violence which accompanied the electoral process.

A political-electoral reform in 2015 led to gender parity in the nominations of political parties, but it is in these elections that it is applied more rigorously.

Therefore, for the first time, 40,162 women will be candidates for different federal and state positions, which announces that women could have a greater political and state presence.

Only one woman currently holds the position of governor, out of 32; in the Chamber of Representatives that was dismissed, they reached 42 percent and 25 percent in the Senate.

In the country's 2,68 municipalities, there are barely 339 women mayors, and in the state of Campeche all the municipalities are taken over by men.

Mexican women politicians are also the target of organized crime groups, who are credited with the majority of the 133 murders that marked the election campaign.

17 women candidates have been executed since September, and the Simone de Beauvior Leadership Institute (ILSB) has recorded 49 cases of gender-based political violence.

However, the Special Prosecutor's Office for Electoral Offences (FEPADE) has dealt with barely less than a dozen investigation files in this regard.

From 2012 to August 2017, Fepade recorded 187 cases of political aggression against women.

  • Published in World

Cuba Inaugurates Parliament with Wide Diversity

Cuba is inaugurating Wednesday the 9th Legislature of its National Parliament, a body of 605 members representing diverse sectors of society and being 53.2 percent of it women.

The new MPs are meeting Wednesday and Thursday at Havana Convention Center after being elected last March 11, an election day in which over 7,400,000 voters casted their ballots for an 86 percent turnout.

The Parliament's seats will be occupied by workers, farmers, teachers, doctors, scientists, writers, artists, religious leaders, students, political leaders, businesspeople, sportsmen, military and workers from the private sectors.

Furthermore, the legislative house is made up of 40.5 percent black and colored people, 13,2 MPs under 35 years, 86 percent university graduates and a average age of 49 years.

A relevant fact is that 47.4 percent of the legislators was elected in neighborhood meetings and that women make up 53.2 percent of its membership makes the Cuban Parliament the second in the world with most women sitting second only to Rwanda (61.3).

Prensa Latina spoke with several of the newly-elected lawmakers who will take the oath Wednesday for a five-year term, and they all stressed that a priority is to continue strengthening socialism, following the legacy of the historical leader of the Cuban revolution, Fidel Castro and the revolutionary generation of the process that began on January 1, 1959.

Jorge Luis Romero, a cobbler from Lisa municipality, in Havana, said people are aware of the need to preserving the social achievements.

'Just look at me; I'm a cobbler and I'll be sitting at the National Parliament; this only happens in Cuba where every single day I stay undisturbed when my children go to school or when someone in the family gets sick, because we have free quality education and health; this is why people defend the revolution,' said the self-employed cobbler.

After inauguration, the 9th Legislature will elect by secret vote the Assembly's Speaker for the next five years, and the new Council of State that is the highest governmental body.

In doing that, lawmakers will be electing the President who is head of State and Government, the first Vice President and five Vice Presidents, the Council's Secretary and the remaining 23 members of the Council of State, which represents the National Parliament in between its two ordinary periods of sessions a year.

  • Published in Cuba

Raúl, the first to vote

The First Secretary of the Communist Party of Cuba Central Committee and President of the Councils of State and Ministers, Army General Raúl Castro Ruz, exercised his right to vote in a polling station located in the Santiago municipality of II Frente Oriental Frank País (Frank País Second Eastern Front)

SEGUNDO FRENTE. – With just a few minutes to go before the clock struck seven this Sunday morning, Cuban President Raul Castro Ruz arrived to vote in polling station 1, constituency 11, located in the Paquito Rosales Benítez School of the Santiago municipality of Segundo Frente.

Alongside other voters who had gathered early to exercise their right to vote, Raúl participated in the opening ceremony of the polling station, during which the Cuban flag was raised, the notes of the National Anthem were sung, the oath that governs the work of electoral authorities was read and the two ballot boxes were shown to be empty before sealing.

Raúl was the first to vote, followed by the First Secretary of the Party in Santiago de Cuba, Lázaro Expósito Canto. The Cuban President conversed with the electoral authorities and the two school girls who watched over the ballot boxes.

On exiting the polling station, Raúl shared anecdotes with residents regarding the founding of the Frank País Second Eastern Front (which this municipality is named after), and said it was a pleasure to have voted alongside them.

The municipality for which the Army General was a candidate to the National Assembly of People’s Power has a total population of around 40,000, divided into 79 electoral constituencies. A total of 114 polling stations were installed here.

This election day took on a special significance in this mountainous territory, as it occurred precisely on the 60th anniversary of the creation of the Frank País Second Front, under the command of the then Comandante Raúl Castro Ruz.

  • Published in Cuba

Cuban Elections Marked by Massive Turnout

Still one hour to go before the polls closed in Cuban Sunday legislative elections, nearly 80 percent of voters had turned out to elect delegates to Provincial Assemblies and the National Parliament, according to preliminary reports.

Until 17:00 local time Sunday, 78,5 percent of 8,740.569 registered voters had casted their votes at the 24,470 polling stations, which were opened until 18:00. The National Electoral Commission is issueing the final report at a press conference this Monday.

Cubans were electing 1,265 delegates to 15 Provincial Assemblies and 605 lawmakers to the National Parliament that will be proclaimed in April.

To First Vice President Miguel Diaz Canel, by exercising their right to vote that is secret and egalitarian, the Cuban people defended their sovereignty in the face of growing threats to the Revolution amidst a complex world juncture.

In the first of voting late last year, a total of 12,515 delegates were elected to the 168 municipal assemblies across the island. These bodies then chose the candidates for this second electoral round to elect members for provincial legislative assemblies and Parliament.

For the elections, more than 200,000 citizens were trained to work at the voting process as electoral commissioners and supporting staff at polling stations.

As a distinguishing mark, children from primary and secondary education levels in their school uniforms guarded the ballot boxes.

  • Published in Cuba

Cuban People Defend their Sovereignty in Elections, Says Diaz-Canel

First Cuban Vice President Miguel Diaz-Canel said today that by exercising the right to vote, the people defend their sovereignty in view of the threats posed against the Revolution in a complex world situation.

After voting at a polling place in Santa Clara, Diaz-Canel reiterated that the elections are held in a context of damaged ties with the United States as a result of an administration that has offended Cuba and has returned to the rhetoric of the Cold War.

Diaz-Canel, candidate for the National Assembly of People's Power (Parliament), referred to the tightened U.S. policy towards Cuba after President Donald Trump took office, while deploring the U.S. Government's decision to go back to the Monroe Doctrine approach.

'With our vote we show that this country continues to be independent, free, sovereign and socialist,' he said after greeting voters, students and members of the electoral process.

Diaz-Canel also said that exercising the right to vote represents a commitment to the historic generation that shaped the Revolution and a tribute to historic leader Fidel Castro, as well as a support for President Raul Castro.

  • Published in Cuba

The Pride of Our Democracy

They were all waiting anxiously. Students and professors gathered early to welcome the visitors. Some have previously met them in person. Others felt curious to know, via their biographies, the most important aspects of their careers.

Finally, they arrived. The school theater hosts the most significant event of all: the exchange of viewpoints.

There is some shyness at first. But the newcomers break the ice. They are not here as a matter of forms. They are here to remove the perception of a simple photo on a wall. They want to be known not only because of their merits —written in a piece of paper—, but also as common people, no matter the importance of what they do.

Soon the ambiance gets pleasantly informal. They talk now about future goals. Young people want to know everything: their work, the electoral process, the reason why they are not from the municipality, and how many times have they been nominated before.

Answers are given one after another. And questions raises from the other side about future careers, functioning of the school hours, and students’ knowledge on the electoral process, and the number of times they have voted before. It was a crystal-clear chat where there was no “they” or “we”, but “all.”

The words “delegate”, “congressmen”, “political system” are now common to all and assume greater significance. Everything is understood as gestures, smiles, and watchful eyes show. It does not only generate interests, but also a profound conviction of voting as a right and duty.

When the meeting seems to come to an end, a new question raises. “Boys and girls, if you are nominated one day, are you going to accept?”

Some look to each other with surprise. No words to say yet. Doubts are written in some faces. And some says “even though we are 16 years old, we are still too young, and being delegate entails great responsibility.”

Nonetheless, to everyone’s surprise, a young face requested the floor. He has already fulfilled such mission and feels the need to share his experience:

“He is right. It is tough. But it is a school to be better women and men. If you were nominated to represent citizens, then do not hesitate. Take it with courage. You only need three things to reach the goal: will, effort, and human sensibility. And there you have a delegate in Cuba.”

The audience faces show light, a light of a simple and irrefutable truth. The ovation is a sign.

This is not a fictional story. I was there and I am pretty sure there have been other meetings similar to this one. The exchange of our congressmen with citizens is far from what we are used to watch all over the world in electoral campaigns.

This is not about delegates looking for aberrant populism. It is about delegates looking to be closer to citizens without obstacles. No one swaps promises for votes. This is a meeting point to share, talk as equals. There is no discrimination in Cuba. There is only one common cause: to defend the Revolution. This is, no doubt, the true face of what we call with pride Socialist Democracy.

Translated by Sergio A. Paneque Diaz / CubaSi Translation Staff

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