Trump’s Impeachment Inquiry Remains Tricky

Like drops of water falling onto the stone for a long time, strong eye-opening facts are cornering Trump at the U.S. House of Representatives.

Or so it believes AP journalist Jill Colvin.

The new fact is that Trump may now provide a written answer about the serious accusations included in the already popular impeachment.

He is being accused of pressing the Ukraine government to investigate his political rivals.

Via Twitter, the President said: “I will strongly consider” Nancy Pelosi’s offer to testify.

“She also said I can do it in writing. Even though I did nothing wrong, and don’t like giving credibility to this No Due Process Hoax.”

I like the idea and in order to get the Congress focused again “I will strongly consider it,” he added.

During the CBS TV show Face the Nation, Pelosi invited Trump to speak all the truth that he wants before the House Intelligence Committee and tell all of his version.

Thus, Pelosi rejected Republicans’ allegations that the impeachment inquiry is devious.

Simultaneously, Chuck Schumer, Democrat leader in the U.S. Senate, confirmed Trump should allow all those around him to go the Committee and testify under oath.

“What is he hiding?” Asked Schumer, but no one answers just yet.

And everything is happening when the House of Intelligence Committee is getting ready for week 2 of public hearings.

Observers recall that the most important witness —Gordon Sondland, ambassador of the U.S. before the European Union and one of the few people who talked to Trump about the issue and testified before Congress — must attend.

As others cannot cooperate in the inquiry, some believe that Sondland “is pretty much involved in the heart of the process,” especially if Trump withheld military assistance to Ukraine to impose an investigation on Joe Biden and his son Hunter.

Several witnesses heard the telephone call where Trump and Sondland, apparently, talked about the need to put pressure on Kiev.

In closed-door depositions last Saturday, Tim Morrison, former employee at the National Security Council, revealed that Sondland told him he was speaking directly with Trump.

According to Morrison, Sondland and Trump had spoken five times when the military assistance to Ukraine was withheld.

Translated by Sergio A. Paneque Díaz/CubaSi Translation Staff

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Who can Bridled Donald Trump?

Apparently, like a psycho, the current emperor has redesigned the world political map according to the immeasurable limits of his megalomania and paranoia.


Branded by the United States government as the main fake news spreaders, social networks, Facebook and Twitter, recently announced the launch of several measures to brake the misinformation that thrives on their servers.


Hence only a year to the presidential elections in the U.S., Facebook is preparing not to repeat again the 2016 mistakes and debacle, with a plan to avoid international interference.



"We have a responsibility to deter any abuse and interference on our platform," said the group commanded by Mark Zuckerberg.

To reach this goal, the social network is testing a user profile verification system with a sort of video-selfie, which implies facial recognition and that, he believes, could be a 0brake on fake accounts.


On the other hand, a little less than a week ago, and having the same intention, Twitter published that, as of November 22nd it will no longer spread political advertising anywhere in the world.


"Although internet advertising is incredibly powerful and very effective for commercial advertising companies, that power brings about significant risks in politics," said Jack Dorsey, co-founder and president of the company, in a tweet.


Undoubtedly, the new policies, from both Facebook and Twitter, will help to contain the flow of what has been called euphemistically post-truth, and avoid international interference that, according to the United States government, influenced in the 2016 elections.



To please the continuous pressures of the Congress in this regard, in recent months both networks have closed hundreds of pages and user accounts of alleged enemies that "influence" the U.S. elections; however, it remains to be seen what the policy of these networks will be for the fake news generated by people like the U.S. president, Donald Trump.



It’s no secret to anyone that most of the fake news of the U.S. presidential campaign in 2016 was spread by Trump's campaign advisors.

Donald Trump raised false statements like that Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama founded ISIS or that Obama was born in Kenya, information that was published "as statements of the Republican candidate" in the traditional media.


According to the study «Media and Post-truth: Analysis of Fake News in U.S. Presidential Elections of 2016 », by Priscilla Muñoz Sanhueza, the election process was tainted by a shroud of fake news, which had its peak from August 2016 until elections day, where more fabricated information was shared on Facebook than the "True" (which, for the most part, favored Donald Trump).



The same study recalls that the mythomania of the current president is nothing new: «There are records that since 2011 he began to question Obama's country of birth on television and Twitter, quoting alleged sources and websites like WND.com and FreedomOutpost.com , which are characterized by publishing fake news (Maheshwari, 2017) ».


It’s also memorable the sayings of the Republican like: “in New Jersey was celebrated the 9/11 attack; that his commercial empire began with a "small loan" from his father, when he inherited forty million dollars ».

In March 2017, again using Twitter, he accused Barack Obama of having ordered to spy on him in October 2016, tapping the telephones of his operations center, without delivering any evidence, which was denied by a spokesman for the former president.



As if that weren’t enough, in April 2019, The Washington Post published a report that assured that after 800 days in office, the U.S. president had made more than 10,000 "fake or misleading" statements.

If anyone still doubts about this personal characteristic of the current White House owner, just have to review the contents of Trump's last intervention during the 74th Session at the United Nations Assembly.

What can be done when even the so-called quality press remains silent, with complicity, before Trump's cynical lies about Iran, China, Venezuela or Cuba.



For those who witnessed the intervention of the U.S. ambassador to the UN, regarding the vote on a bill against the Blockade of Cuba, there’s no doubt that, in Donald Trump’s imperial era, lies have taken over truth.


Apparently, like a psycho, the current emperor has redesigned the world political map according to the immeasurable limits of his megalomania and paranoia.



Regarding this last trait of his personality, more than once he has summoned, as if they were federal companies, the owners of the social networks to accuse them of censoring his person or the supporters of conservative thinking that took him to the oval office.


It’s worth wondering: If Trump manages to survive, regardless of his lies, the impeachment to which the Democrats attempt to submit him, can anyone dare to put a bridle of honesty on him?

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Pelosi Says Trump Is 'In Her Wheelhouse' If He Tries to 'Intimidate' Whistleblower

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in an interview on CBS' "Face The Nation" on Sunday that US President Donald Trump is "in her wheelhouse'' if he tries to ''intimidate'' the whistleblower, the major ''witness'' in the ongoing impeachment probe against the president.

"I will make sure he does not intimidate the whistleblower. I told the president, "you're in my wheelhouse when you come after the whistleblower", Pelosi said.

Trump has numerous times requested the House Committee, publicly and on his Twitter, to disclose the identity of the so-called whistleblower, who alleged that during his 25 July conversation with Wolodymir Zelensky the president ''put pressure'' on his Ukrainian counterpart to investigate into potential corruption crimes involving former Vice President Joe Biden and his son in Ukraine.

The whistleblower has preferred to act on the condition of anonymity, but it turned out later that the information he provided about the phone call was, in fact, "something he heard from somebody else".

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US: New bitter questions on Trump

The most recent events involving Donald Trump are addressed by this EFE newswire.

It starts: the drumbeats of the impeachment process resounded on Monday, but the White House did not want to know.

Likewise, it points out that Trump’s answers to Democrats —characterized by no strategy at all, chaos, improvisation, and mistakes— may wind up hurting himself.

It adds that before the actual crisis, the government’s response has been inaccurate and “Trump growingly looks like himself.”

Michael Cornfield —Political Science professor at the George Washington University— stated to the press that “the President is drunk on power and he is now looking for a new fight.”

EFE warns it is necessary to know Trump’s basic behavior to understand this White House reaction.

Chris Edelson, Politics professor at the American University, highlights he has no strategy to face the upcoming impeachment.

And adds, “he is a gangster. He thinks he is the Big Boss in the mafia world. He is an abuser and authoritarian. And he believes Republicans will always support him no matter what.”

He takes last Tuesday’s phone conversation as an example. This chat was leaked to the press between the President and Speaker Nancy Pelosi, before announcing a potential impeachment inquiry.

“Hey, can we do something about this whistleblower complaint? Can we work something out?’ The head of the White House asked.

Pelosi´s answer was sharp: “Yes, you could tell your people to abide the law.”

Afterwards, Trump showed once again this behavior in a private meeting with diplomats in New York where he suggested they should “get rid of” the whistleblower.

As previously reported, the whistleblower is a CIA agent who worked at the White House.

In the meeting Trump said:

“Who’s the person who provided such information to the whistleblower? Because that’s close to a spy. You know what we used to do in the old days when we were smart? Right? With spies and treason, right?” Everything he said was leaked to the press.

The aforementioned professor Edelson said that Trump’s statements reminded him of the George Orwell’s novel “1984.”

And he added, “Trump said he did not do it, but he later asserted that there were no wrongdoings if he did.” The analysts said that is the “doublethinking” language.

In recent days, the New York Times released that Trump pressed in a phone conversation his Ukrainian counterpart, Vladimir Zelenski, so he could open an inquiry on former Vice President and current Democrat presidential candidate Joe Biden, to undermine his presidential run for 2020.

EFE argues that such presidential formula and his attacks against the media have brought back hefty return for him. This week only, he has raised 13 million USD for his campaign.

Contrary to the common sense, his personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani has attended every debate in major television networks on daily basis.

The goal was to defend his role, but he ended up incriminating himself even more, paired with other scandals.

Giuliani, via Fox News, read the messages exchanged with diplomats to prove that Trump’s contacts with Ukraine were already known by the U.S. State Department.

According to Karen Hult, expert in the dynamics of the West Wing, Giuliani has emerged as Trump's main speaker in this crisis because the White House communications office has failed to structure a strategy and currently has an "inconsistent" relationship with the leader.

The apotheosis of this entire riot occurred on Wednesday. That day the White House mistakenly sent an email to Democratic lawmakers outlining their strategy on how Republicans should answer questions about the controversial call between Trump and Zelenski.

In the brief, entitled "What you need to know," the White House advised lawmakers to use the word "myth" to describe the conversation between the two leaders and asked the Democrats to "blame a media frenzy of false accusations."

As if that were not enough, then the White House sent another message to the Democrats asking them to please return their strategy.

Here you have the small world of that powerful nation, which proclaims itself the utmost example of democratic values of the world.

And it is now sunk in a profound crisis that rushes from chaos to an unstoppable rupture that goes deeper as days pass by.

Translated by Sergio A. Paneque Diaz/CubaSi Translation Staff

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Impeachment dominates, but much other work awaits Congress

Impeachment may have leapfrogged to the top of the national agenda, but members of Congress still have their day jobs as legislators, and they're returning to Washington this coming week with mixed hopes of success.

It's a volatile, difficult-to-predict time in Washington as lawmakers end a two-week break. The notion that President Donald Trump could do much significant dealmaking with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, his impeachment antagonist, could be fanciful, given Trump's impulsiveness and demands for border wall money.

An important trade agreement pact has a pulse. An effort to deal with high prescription drug prices seems stuck.

Pelosi, D-Calif., is aware of the political imperative to avoid looking tied up in impeachment while leaving the rest of the nation's business hanging. At a recent news conference she solicited questions on topics such as trade before turning to impeachment, reminding that the Democratic-controlled House has sent bill after bill to the GOP-led Senate, which has done little else but vote on presidential nominations for months.

Divided government has produced scant results thus far, except for a small-scale budget deal that lawmakers are struggling to put in place. The next few months could prove make or break for high-profile agenda items such as an updated trade agreement with Canada and Mexico, a full slate of spending bills and prescription drug legislation. Pelosi insists impeachment doesn't have to harm the legislative agenda in Washington.

"They have nothing to do with each other," Pelosi said earlier this month. "We have a responsibility to uphold our oath of office, to support and defend the Constitution of the United States. We also have a responsibility to get the job done for the American people."

The atmosphere isn't exactly brimming with optimism. Hopes for a near-term breakthrough on trade, one of the few items on which Pelosi and Republicans are in general alignment, faded after AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka issued a combative warning against a speedy vote on the new North American pact.

On spending, negotiators are trying push through a $1.4 trillion package of agency spending bills to fill in the details of this summer's budget-and-debt accord.

Experienced bargainers such as GOP Sen. Richard Shelby of Alabama, chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, are taking the lead on that but lingering bitterness over the U.S.-Mexico wall fight threatens to again delay a resolution. That's particularly so after Trump's attacked lawmakers' traditional power of the purse by raiding military construction projects to finance wall construction.

Given the uncertainty, lawmakers may end up doing what they do best: Kicking the can down the road.

Months-late enactment of the annual agency appropriations bills is increasingly common in Washington, and it's clear that another temporary government-wide funding bill will be needed when the current one expires in six weeks. Likewise, there's no hard and fast deadline for ratifying an important trade pact with Mexico and Canada that an administration priority.

Pelosi supported the original North American Free Trade Agreement in 1994, as did the current House Ways and Means Committee chairman, Rep. Richard Neal, who has forged a good relationship with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer. Pelosi and Neal, D-Mass., had been making cautious but optimistic assurances about the long-delayed trade pact, which is being held up in large part over Mexico's efforts to toughen labor standards and limit U.S. job losses.

A green light from labor would make Pelosi's job much easier, so the outlook for the trade agreement soured considerably when Trumka warned that labor would work to kill it if House Democrats tried to rush a vote.

"If there was a vote before Thanksgiving, the agreement would be defeated," Trumka told The Washington Post.

Steve Elmendorf, a lobbying who cultivates close ties to Democratic leaders, said that before Trumka's remarks, there seemed to be a sense of progress and that lawmakers would have liked to hold a vote before the holiday. He said that if Pelosi "can get a good deal, she is completely capable of compartmentalizing this and a bunch of other issues in a different lane than impeachment."

What does need to pass before Thanksgiving is another short-term measure to prevent a government shutdown. That would buy more time for lawmakers to try to negotiate a full package of spending bills.

Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., have a proven track record as negotiators who can deliver. But Trump could upend the situation at any time. He's at least given negotiators the green light to try to find a way to an agreement.

The glass half-full take is that both Trump and Pelosi need legislative victories heading into next year's elections. Pelosi has a slew of freshmen Democrats from swing districts with lots of middle-of-the-road voters, while Trump hasn't delivered on many bread-and-butter issues since his 2017 tax cut bill.

Talks on prescription drugs face considerable obstacles, however. McConnell has promised to stop Pelosi's bill is its tracks, but a bipartisan Senate bill has divided Republicans and faces big hurdles of its own.

There's another factor that tilts the playing field toward delay: There is plenty of time. Unlike the burst of legislating that occurred on the cusp of President Bill Clinton's impeachment in the fall of 1998, Congress can still wrap up its work next year.

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US House Speaker Pelosi formally announces impeachment inquiry against Trump

In the United States, House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi launched a formal impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump on Tuesday, yielding to mounting pressure from fellow Democrats.

One hundred and seventy-three House Democrats are now calling for an impeachment inquiry following whistleblower allegations President Trump pressured the Ukrainian president to investigate political rival Joe Biden's family.

Pelosi said such actions would imply a “betrayal of his oath of office” and declared, “No one is above the law.”

With the announcement, Trump could probably become the fourth US president to face impeachment proceedings.

In New York, Trump did not deny withholding Congressionally approved aid to Ukraine, arguing that Europe and other nations are not helping that Eastern European country either.

Congress members consider the president should not withhold aid from a country to get dirt on his opponents, because that is unconstitutional.

Meanwhile the president previewed his defense in an all-caps tweet: “PRESIDENTIAL HARASSMENT!” and he said he will release an un-redacted and unclassified transcript of a July phone call between him and Ukraine's president.

The White House is also planning to release to Congress a whistleblower's complaint that triggered the week-long crisis that has rocked the Trump presidency.

In tne complain, Trump reportedly pressured Ukraine's president to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden.

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Trump Worried About Impeachment, Thinks It's "Real Possibility": Report

Washington: US President Donald Trump has expressed concern that he could be impeached when Democrats take over the House and saw it as a "real possibility", a source close to him told CNN.

But Trump isn't certain it would happen, the source said on Monday night.

A separate source close to the White House told CNN that aides inside the West Wing believe "the only issue that may stick" in the impeachment process is the campaign finance violations tied to the President's former personal lawyer Michael Cohen's payouts to Stormy Daniels and Karen McDougal, both women have alleged to have affairs with Trump.

Impeachment talk has ratcheted up in recent days following a blockbuster filing from prosecutors in the Southern District of New York.

In the filing, prosecutors directly alleged for the first time that Cohen was being directed by Trump when he broke the law during the 2016 presidential campaign.

Democrats were suggesting that Trump committed an impeachable offence and could be sent to prison when his term in the White House is over.

The incoming chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, Representative Jerry Nadler, said on Sunday the allegations, if proven, would constitute "impeachable offences".

Democratic Senato Chris Coons said earlier on Monday that Trump could be indicted after he leaves office.

White House officials, at the moment, still do not believe that Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into possible collusion will result in impeachment.

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In Latest Scandal, Brazilian President Temer Accused of Buying Votes to Block Impeachment

Temer is accused of buying support to block the trial against him for corruption that could lead to his suspension or impeachment.

Brazilian President Michel Temer is facing accusations that he bribed lawmakers to assure their support ahead of his possible trial for corruption, a decision which is currently in the hands of the Lower House of Congress.

RELATED: Brazil's Temer Won't Resign and Says Nothing Will Destroy Him

Lawmakers from the leftist Worker's Party, or PT, will deliver the formal accusation to the Attorney General's office on Wednesday.

Paulo Pimenta, Wadih Damous and Paulo Teixeira allege the appointed president used his position and power to secure support against the corruption charges presented by Attorney General Rodrigo Janot to the Supreme Court, which is now being evaluated by the Lower House.

This week Temer received at least 30 lawmakers in the Planalto Palace in Brasilia according to the official agenda.Among them were 11 members of the Constitution and Justice Commission of the Lower House, who will decide if the charges against the president will proceed or not, according to Brasil 247

Temer's lawyer Antonio Claudio Mariz de Oliveira is expected to present part of his defense to the commission on Wednesday. For the accusation to be admitted it needs to have the vote of 34 of the 66 members of the commission.

RELATED: Second General Strike against President Temer's Reforms

After this, it will have up to five sessions to debate and vote on the final report by the commission speaker, Sergio Zveiter, who also belongs to Temer's ruling PMDB party.

The report will then be submitted to the Lower House for a vote, that needs the approval of 341 of the 513 lawmakers to be accepted.

Temer and his aide Rodrigo Rocha Loures are accused of receiving and approving bribes in the largest corruption investigation in the country known as Operation Car Wash.

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