Scarce public in Copa America: Economic Crisis, Expensive Tickets

Featured Scarce public in Copa America: Economic Crisis, Expensive Tickets

The economic crisis and high prices of tickets to the stadiums appear today as two of the main reasons for the low public presence in the Copa America in Brazil, according to journalists.

In a program on SporTV, TV channel that transmits games of the competition, a group of journalists agreed that a marked absence of fans predominates in the sports facilities during the first round of the main South American tournament that began on the 14th. June and ends on July 7.

For informants, several factors contribute to the fact, mainly, of course, the high cost of income. Marcelo Barreto, for example, recalled the economic crisis in Argentina.

He explained that 'the Cup America does not attract people from all over the world. We are living in a continent in crisis. Argentineans who before invaded Brazil and filled Copacabana, no longer have that power of mobilization. They will not come in the same amount. '

Marcos Uchôa also cited the economic crisis, but in Brazil itself. For him, the organization should provide more income for public school students.

He considered there is an 'economic crisis since 2015 and it is already impacting pockets'.

This, he argued, 'impacts football, which is more popular. Organizers are missing a great opportunity to enter public schools. In that first phase, it could be expanded further. Of course you will not fill stadiums, becauswe it has costs. But could not organizers give more income? ', he asked.

For Rogério Corrêa, identification of the Brazilian fan is greater with the club of the heart.

He explained 'it is proven that Brazilian's relationship is not with soccer, but with the club. When you have a foreign Brazilian team (with more players who play abroad today), there is no longer a passion link. '

Previously, the president of the South American Football Confederation (Conmebol), Alejandro Dominguez, showed concern about the low number of people attending the Copa América games, especially what was seen on Saturday in the Venezuela-Peru match.

'It worries people, of course it worries. We want people to always see the best players in the world and the South American players are the best in the world', Dominguez told reporters after the inauguration of a coexistence space on Copacabana beach, Rio de Janeiro.

He acknowledged that Brazil is the 'country where football is lived' ... and there are 'games that have a lot of fans and others that unfortunately do not have as much,' he added.

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