A warning to Trump? Twitter reminds ‘world leaders’ aren’t immune to deplatforming

Twitter has put US President Donald Trump – and other world leaders – on notice with a clarification of its rules, letting one of the platform’s most popular users know that it can cut off his ability to go viral at any time.

Twitter clarified its rules concerning powerful political leaders in a blog post on Tuesday, never mentioning Trump by name but clearly keeping him in mind. The new guidelines seem uncontroversial enough on the surface, but leave a wide loophole for potential deplatforming of the #Resistance’s favorite punching bag.

While “direct interactions with fellow public figures, comments on political issues of the day, or foreign policy saber-rattling on economic or military issues are generally not in violation of the Twitter Rules” at the moment, they can get a belligerent world leader’s tweets placed in a no-man’s-land where they cannot be replied to, liked, or shared, Twitter warned.

Also on rt.com When social media stops being social: How Twitter and Facebook have rendered Americans uncivil, insecure & addicted...

They haven’t had to use the quarantine option yet, but they’re just reminding any tweet-happy world leader who might happen to be reading that it’s possible, and that it could stop their tweet from going viral. Not that they have any particular leader in mind, or anything.

There are some “red lines” which world leaders cannot cross, including “promotion of terrorism,” doxxing, child sexual exploitation, promoting self-harm, and – in perhaps the most obvious dig at Trump – “clear and direct threats of violence against an individual.” Context is key to the latter, Twitter explained, claiming “commentary on political and foreign policy issues would likely not result in enforcement” – but “likely” leaves the door open to the president being deplatformed for his usual belligerent posturing, should Twitter decide his latest tweetstorm doesn’t qualify as political commentary.

Also on rt.com ‘This isn’t impeachment, it’s a COUP!’ Trump warns followers Dems are out for their God-given freedoms & rights...

Harris had called for the suspension of Trump’s account after the president accused an anonymous CIA whistleblower of spying and House intel committee chief Adam Schiff of “fraud and treason,” claiming the tweets constituted threats because Trump had – offline – commented that the US “used to handle [spies and treason] a little differently than we do now.” Those tweets - plus Trump’s quote of a Fox News claim that removing him from office would cause a “civil war-like fracture” - had “put our democracy in danger,” Harris complained.

Twitter politely demurred to kick one of its most popular users off its platform then, disappointing the president’s many haters. But the new rules leave the door open for a more robust complaint to exile the president from his favorite platform, and Twitter apparently wants to make sure Trump knows it.

  • Published in World

Why The CIA Doesn't Spy On The UAE

The United Arab Emirates finances the military leader trying to topple a United Nations-recognised government in Libya. It helps lead a coalition of nations imposing an economic blockade of Qatar, despite U.S. calls to resolve the dispute. It hired former staffers of the U.S. National Security Agency as elite hackers to spy in a program that included Americans as surveillance targets, a Reuters investigation found this year.

And yet, in a highly unusual practice, the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) does not spy on the UAE's government, three former CIA officials familiar with the matter told Reuters, creating what some critics call a dangerous blind spot in U.S. intelligence.

The CIA's posture isn't new. What's changed is the nature of the tiny but influential OPEC nation's intervention across the Middle East and Africa - fighting wars, running covert operations and using its financial clout to reshape regional politics in ways that often run counter to U.S. interests, according to the sources and foreign policy experts.

The CIA's failure to adapt to the UAE's growing military and political ambitions amounts to a "dereliction of duty," said a fourth former CIA official.

The U.S. intelligence community doesn't completely ignore the UAE. Another branch, the National Security Agency (NSA), conducts electronic surveillance - a lower-risk, lower-reward kind of intelligence-gathering - inside the UAE, two sources with knowledge of NSA operations told Reuters. And the CIA works with UAE intelligence in a "liaison" relationship that involves intelligence sharing on common enemies, such as Iran or al-Qaeda.

But the CIA does not gather "human intelligence" - the most valuable and difficult-to-obtain information - from UAE informants on its autocratic government, the three former CIA officials told Reuters.

The CIA, the NSA and the White House declined to comment on U.S. espionage practices in the UAE. The UAE's foreign ministry and its U.S. embassy did not respond to requests for comment.

The CIA's hands-off practice - which hasn't been previously reported in the media - puts the UAE on an extremely short list of other countries where the agency takes a similar approach, former intelligence officials said. They include the four other members of an intelligence coalition called "The Five Eyes": Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Canada.

CIA spies gather human intelligence on almost every other nation where the United States has significant interests, including some key allies, according to four former CIA officials.

The closest contrast to the UAE may be Saudi Arabia - another influential U.S. ally in the Middle East that produces oil and buys U.S. weapons. Unlike the UAE, Saudi Arabia is often targeted by the CIA, according to two former CIA officials and a former intelligence officer for a Gulf nation. Saudi intelligence agents have caught several CIA agents trying to recruit Saudi officials as informants, the sources said.

The Saudi intelligence agencies do not complain publicly about CIA spying attempts but privately meet with the agency's station chief in Riyadh to ask that the CIA officers involved be quietly ejected from the country, said the former intelligence official for a Gulf nation.

Robert Baer, a former CIA agent and author, called the lack of human intelligence on the UAE "a failure" when told about it by Reuters. U.S. policymakers, he said, need the best available information on the internal politics and family feuds of Middle Eastern monarchies.

"If you pride yourself on being a world service, it's a failure," he said. "The royal families are crucial."

'ROGUE STATE'

A former official in U.S. President Donald Trump's administration said the lack of UAE intelligence is alarming because the desert monarchy now operates as a "rogue state" in strategic nations such as Libya and Qatar and further afield in Africa.

In Sudan, the UAE spent years and billions of dollars propping up long-serving Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir, then abandoned him and supported the military leaders who overthrew him in April. The new government's security forces in June killed dozens of protesters who were pushing for civilian rule and elections. The UAE has also built military bases in Eritrea and the self-declared Republic of Somaliland.

"You turn over any rock in the horn of Africa, and you find the UAE there," the former Trump administration official said.

The UAE has asserted itself as a financial and military power in areas "far from its immediate neighborhood," said Sara Leah Whitson, executive director of the Middle East and North Africa Division of Human Rights Watch.

"Whether Somalia, or Eritrea or Djibouti, or Yemen, the UAE is not asking for permission," she said.

In Yemen, the UAE and Saudi Arabia have led a coalition of nations fighting Iran-aligned Houthi rebels, but the UAE recently started drawing down troops amid international criticism over air strikes that have killed thousands of civilians and a humanitarian crisis that has pushed millions to the brink of famine. The U.S. Congress recently passed resolutions to halt arms sales to Saudi Arabia and the UAE, but President Trump vetoed the measures.

The UAE government has spent $46.8 million on U.S. lobbyists since 2017, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.

One of the three former CIA officials with knowledge of the agency's UAE operations said intelligence on its government is needed for reasons beyond its regional interventions. The UAE is also forging closer ties with Russia - including a wide-ranging strategic partnership signed last year to cooperate on security, trade and oil markets - and with China, where Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed, the crown prince of Abu Dhabi and the UAE's defector ruler, last month made a three-day visit for a UAE-China economic forum.

Some national security experts, however, continue to see enough alignment between U.S. and UAE interests to explain the continued lack of spying.

"Their enemies are our enemies," said Norman Roule, a retired CIA official, referring to Iran and al-Qaeda. "Abu Dhabi's actions have contributed to the war on terror, particularly against al-Queda in Yemen."

FEAR OF DEMOCRACY, POLITICAL ISLAM

The Abu Dhabi crown prince controls the foreign policy of the UAE, a federation of desert emirates, with a small group of advisors. He installed his U.S-educated brother, Sheikh Tahnoon bin Zayed, a mixed-martial arts buff who owns a stable of Arabian race horses, as his National Security Advisor. His son, Sheikh Khalid bin Mohammed, runs the country's sprawling internal surveillance network.

The UAE's rising interventionism dates to 2011. Mass protests demanding democracy across the region during the so-called Arab Spring sparked rising concern within the UAE palace elite over the preservation of its own power, said Jodi Vittori, a former Air Force Intelligence officer now with the Carnegie Foundation for International Peace.

Like many Gulf royals, UAE leaders viewed the demonstrations as a threat to monarchic rule in the region. They have since fought the rise of political Islam and the Muslim Brotherhood, the international Islamic party that briefly rose to power in Egypt after the 2011 protests that ousted President Hosni Mubarak. The UAE cut off financial support to Egypt when brotherhood candidate Mohamed Mursi was elected president in 2012, and then resumed sending billions in aid after Egypt's army ousted Mursi a year later.

Vittori, of the Carnegie Foundation, acknowledged some continuing shared goals between the U.S. and UAE governments but said those interests are diverging as the UAE's monarchy focuses on self-preservation.

"When the goal is regime-survival at all costs," she said, "it's not one that's going to align with the U.S."

  • Published in World

Iran says it has arrested CIA spies; UK to unveil response to ship crisis

DUBAI/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Iran said on Monday it had captured 17 spies working for the CIA and sentenced some of them to death, an announcement President Donald Trump dismissed as “totally false” amid an escalating international crisis over tankers in the Gulf.

The Iranian announcement came hours before Britain was due to unveil its response to Iran’s seizure of a British oil tanker, a move that has escalated a three-month confrontation that nearly drew the United States and Iran into a shooting war.

“The Report of Iran capturing CIA spies is totally false. Zero truth. Just more lies and propaganda (like their shot-down drone) put out by a Religious Regime that is Badly Failing and has no idea what to do. Their Economy is dead, and will get much worse. Iran is a total mess!” tweeted Trump.

Iranian state television published images it said showed CIA officers who had been in touch with the suspected spies. The Ministry of Intelligence said the 17 spies had been arrested in the 12 months to March 2019. Some had been sentenced to death, according to another report.

Such announcements are not unusual in Iran and are often made for domestic consumption. But the timing suggested a hardening of the Iranian position as the Gulf crisis escalates.

In London, Prime Minister Theresa May led a meeting of her government’s COBR emergency committee to respond to Friday’s capture of the Stena Impero tanker by Iranian commandoes who abseiled onto its deck from helicopters in the Strait of Hormuz.

British ministers were expected to unveil their plans in a speech to parliament later on Monday. Regional experts say London has few good options to exert leverage over Iran at a time when Washington has already imposed the maximum possible economic sanctions, banning Iran’s global oil exports.

But the incident may prompt Britain and other countries to be more forthcoming as Washington has asked its reluctant allies to provide more ships to help secure the Gulf.

Asked on Fox News about any possible U.S. role over the seized tanker, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said pointedly: “The responsibility ... falls to the United Kingdom to take care of their ships.”

Confrontation between the United States and Iran has spiraled since last year when President Donald Trump pulled out of an international agreement signed by his predecessor Barack Obama which guaranteed Iran access to world trade in return for curbs to its nuclear program.

In May this year Washington closed loopholes in sanctions, effectively barring all countries from buying Iranian oil.

Since then, Iran has stepped up its nuclear activity beyond limits in the deal and Washington has accused Tehran of attacking ships in the Gulf. In June, after Iran shot down a U.S. drone, Trump ordered retaliatory air strikes, only to abort them minutes before impact, the closest the United States has come to bombing Iran in their 40 year history of animosity.

Last week the United States said it had shot down an Iranian drone, which Tehran denied.

Washington’s major European allies Britain, France and Germany opposed Trump’s decision to quit the nuclear deal and have tried to remain neutral. But Britain was drawn more directly into the confrontation on July 4 when its Royal Marines seized an Iranian tanker off Gibraltar, accused of violating European sanctions on Syria.

Iran repeatedly threatened to retaliate for that incident and has made little secret that its capture of the Stena Impero two weeks later was intended as a retaliatory move. It says the ship is being held over safety concerns and the 23-member crew, including 18 Indians and no British citizens, are safe.

As Britain weighed its next step, a recording emerged on Sunday of Britain’s only warship in the Gulf radioing in vain to try to persuade Iranian forces not to board Stena Impero. That showed the difficulty a mid-sized naval power would have in protecting ships in the strait between Iran and the Arabian peninsula, the most important waterway of the global oil trade.

The United States, which has an aircraft carrier and several other warships in the area as part of its Fifth Fleet based in Iran, has been trying to enlist other countries to join an international task force to protect shipping.

The United States has been struggling to win its allies’ support for an initiative to heighten surveillance of Middle East oil shipping lanes because of fears it will increase tension with Iran, six sources familiar with the matter said.

  • Published in World

Russia to make its own show about Chernobyl that implicates the US

Russian state TV is working on its own version of Chernobyl, a series based on the worst nuclear accident in history.

The NTV drama will deviate from the acclaimed HBO series - and from historical reality - by claiming that the CIA was involved in the disaster.

Director Alexey Muradov claims it will show "what really happened back then".

HBO's miniseries, which concluded on Monday, received the highest ever score for a TV show on IMdB, as well as a 9.1 rating on Russian equivalent Kinopoisk.

But in an interview with Komsomolskaya Pravda, Russia's most widely-read tabloid, Mr Muradov said his version of the show "proposes an alternative view on the tragedy in Pripyat".

"There is a theory that Americans infiltrated the Chernobyl nuclear power plant," he told the paper. "Many historians do not rule out the possibility that on the day of the explosion, an agent of the enemy's intelligence services was working at the station."

The Hollywood Reporter reports that the Russian culture ministry has contributed 30 million rubles ($463,000; £363,000) to the show.

The No. 4 reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear plant exploded on 26 April 1986 in the Ukrainian city of Pripyat.

At least 31 people were killed in the immediate aftermath, and the effects continue to be felt to this day.

What did Russia think of HBO's Chernobyl?

There has been plenty of praise in Russia for the authenticity of Chernobyl.

Izvestia newspaper declared it a more 'realistic' portrayal of the era than most Russian films manage. There's also admiration of how the series conveys the heroism of ordinary people.

But there's been a crescendo of criticism, too. One columnist declared the show a plot to undermine Russia's current atomic agency. Others called it American 'propaganda', blackening the image of the USSR and exaggerating the callousness of the Soviet response.

No-one disputes that it's got people talking. They're been busy sharing their own Chernobyl stories on social media, with younger Russians often hearing them for the first time. So one Twitter user thanked the series for 'giving us back our history.'

In the end, as one commentator concludes, the main reason for the backlash is likely a feeling of shame that it was the US that told the tale of Chernobyl, not Russia itself.

The show has been particularly unpopular with Russian state TV and the country's tabloid newspapers.

Speaking to TV website Teleprogramma, columnist Anatoly Wasserman said: "If Anglo-Saxons film something about Russians, it definitely will not correspond to the truth."

This, he continued, was because "they don't like us" and "they cannot understand us".

Komsomolskaya Pravda published several negative articles about the show - including one floating a conspiracy theory that it was produced by competitors of Rosatom, Russia's state nuclear company, to ruin the country's reputation as a nuclear power.

But reviewers in independent media outlets praised its writer Craig Mazin for his minute attention to detail.

Slava Malamud, a US-based journalist who grew up during the Soviet era in what is now Moldova, wrote on the independent Russian news site Meduza that "the respect and meticulousness the show's creators brought to their work is breathtaking".

"Like I see the license plate for a car in one scene has the real numbers for the [Kiev] region," he said. "Who's going to notice that in America or England?"

Meanwhile, Moscow Times journalist Ilya Shepelin says that the fact that a US channel produced the show "is a source of shame that the pro-Kremlin media apparently cannot live down".

"[The show's] episodes focus on the harrowing and self-sacrificing struggle that the Soviet people waged against the consequences of the explosion. And it was these people who saved Europe - at the cost of their own lives and health," he writes.

"Russia, however, does not honour these individuals as heroes who saved Europe."

  • Published in Culture

Pompeo says US intel only OCCASIONALLY ‘gets things wrong’, after bragging about ‘lying’ CIA

US intelligence agencies occasionally make mistakes but should still be trusted and taken at their word, according to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who once famously boasted that the CIA “lies, cheats and steals.”

In an interview with Euronews, the former CIA chief insisted that US intelligence agencies are right to consider Chinese telecom giant Huawei a national security threat – a claim that has been disputed by Washington’s European allies.

There’s no doubt the intelligence community gets things wrong from time to time but their overall body of work is excellent and to be relied upon and trusted.

He bragged further that "Western countries, liberal democracies share a common value set. The Chinese don’t share that value set.”

While the US insists Huawei products contain “backdoors” which can be used to spy on behalf of the Chinese government, no proof of the alleged snooping operation has yet been produced. Unconvinced by the unsupported claims, some of Washington’s closest allies have rejected US pressure to end cooperation with the Chinese firm. Germany, for example, announced in March that it would not prevent Huawei from bidding on contracts to develop the country’s 5G networks.

Also on rt.com Germany won’t ban Huawei & ready to oppose US pressure – economy minister...

Berlin and others are right to be weary of Washington’s evidence-scarce accusations against Huawei. In just the last two decades, US intelligence agencies have been repeatedly accused of misleading and lying to the American public and the international community.

Their less than stellar track record includes providing dubious intelligence about Saddam Hussein’s non-existent weapons of mass destruction program, and runs right up to the current day.

Also on rt.com ‘We lied, we cheated, we stole’: Pompeo offers honest, if disturbing admission about CIA activity...

Anonymous sources in the intelligence agency were repeatedly cited by the media to push now-debunked Russiagate. Former CIA Director John Brennan even predicted that there would be big-name indictments before the release of Robert Mueller’s deflating report. When the indictments never came, Brennan suggested that he “may have received bad information.”

Pompeo himself has seemingly contradicted his own assertion that America’s spooks should be trusted. In April, he bragged about how the CIA “lied, cheated and stole” during his time at the agency.

  • Published in World

CIA Declassified Info: Europe Wanted Own 'Operation Condor'

Eruopean nations said, "the terrorist and subversive threat in Europe has reached such dangerous levels" that they needed their own Operation Condor.

Declassified information from the United States government shows that European governments during the 1970s wanted to learn how to conduct their own ‘Operation Condor’ from South American dictators who were systematically torturing and killing dissidents in the region.

RELATED: Controversy Around Uruguay Army Role in Dictatorship Continues

In the documents opened to the public April 12, official statements from the United Kingdom, France, and then West Germany were looking for advice from South American dictators in mainly Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, Brazil, and Chile to combat the “dangerous level (of) subversion" from the left.

"The terrorist and subversive threat in Europe has reached such dangerous levels that (member countries) believe it would be better to combine their intelligence resources in a collaborative organization, as is carried out according to Operation Condor," European officials communicated to the Condor Plan secretariat in Buenos Aires, according to the files.

The declassified documents from the U.S. that politically supported the operation, reveal that the secretariat said: "They emphasized that if a similar organization were established (in Europe), all operations against the subversives would be coordinated in such a way that the intelligence service of one country would not operate unilaterally in another country."

Operation Condor, or Plan Condor, was a carried out by the military dictatorships in South America’s southern cone in the 1970s and ‘80s in a concerted violent effort to rid the region of anyone the militaries perceived as a threat to their power and neoliberal policies, mainly, real or supposed communists and socialist.

An estimated 60,000 people were killed by the Latin American states in the clandestine operation, 30,000 in Argentina alone. Another 30,000 were disappeared and 400,000 imprisoned during the Plan. However, as more information is disclosed by the CIA and investigated independently these numbers are expected to grow.

RELATED:  
Chile Convicts 20 Pinochet-Era Intelligence Agents for Role in Operation Condor

According to Spain’s El Diario newspaper, a CIA document dated April 7, 1978, shows that European spies visited Operation Condor headquarters in Buenos Aires the year prior to gather information on how to implement similar policies of state torture and violence.

The document states: "Representatives of the intelligence services of West Germany, France and the United Kingdom visited the coordination secretariat of Operation Condor in Buenos Aires during the month of September 1977 to discuss methods to establish an antisubversive organization similar to Operation Condor."

The document is part of a 47,000-page declassified archive specifically about the 1976-83 Argentine dictatorship made public a week ago.

"These documents are very important," says Gaston Chillier from the Center for Legal and Social Studies (CELS), a human rights organization in Argentina.

"There are documents from six or seven different US intelligence agencies and we hope to find information that will help us in the trials that are open against the criminals of the dictatorship." So far more than 900 former Argentine military members have been convicted for crimes during the Operation Condor era.

The documents also show U.S. communiques about Condor deaths in Argentina and Uruguay.

"The Uruguayan government has been informed privately by the Argentine authorities that eight of the ten bodies found on the Uruguayan coast are the result of Argentine anti-terrorist operations," states a cable from the U.S. State Department in May 1976. "The source ensures that the bodies were thrown into the Río de la Plata from helicopters after the interrogations carried out by the Argentine authorities," reads the official U.S. statement.

Director of Human Rights of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Uruguay, Dianela Pi, said Friday her office will be requesting from Argentina the files they have in their possession.

The April 12 batch of declassified information was the third and last of the U.S.’s Argentina Declassification Project. The first two installments were made during the U.S. Barack Obama administration.

  • Published in World

Saudi Prince Gave Order To "Silence" Khashoggi, CIA Has Recording: Report

Istanbul: A Turkish newspaper reported on Thursday director Gina Haspel signalled to Turkish officials last month that the agency had a recording of a call in which Saudi Arabia's crown prince gave instructions to "silence" Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Asked about the report, a Turkish official told Reuters he had no information about such a recording. Saudi Arabia has said Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman had no prior knowledge of Khashoggi's killing at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul six weeks ago.

"There is talk of another recording," Hurriyet newspaper journalist Abdulkadir Selvi wrote in a column, saying the purported call took place between Prince Mohammed and his brother, Saudi Arabia's ambassador to Washington.

"It is being said that CIA chief Gina Haspel indicated this during her visit to Turkey," he wrote, adding that they had discussed Khashoggi, a critic of the kingdom's de facto ruler.

"It is being said the crown prince gave orders to 'silence Jamal Khashoggi as soon as possible'," in a call which was monitored by the U.S. agency, he said.

Khashoggi was killed at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2 in an operation that Turkey's President Tayyip Erdogan has said was ordered by the highest level of Saudi leadership.

After offering numerous contradictory explanations, Riyadh said last week Khashoggi had been killed and his body dismembered when negotiations to persuade him to return to Saudi Arabia failed.

  • Published in World

The Skripal: Healthier than ever before

Today the couple —they were dead first, then badly injured— cannot be found after being discharged from a British hospital where they made a “miraculous” recovery and even gained some weight.

One hundred fifty Russian diplomats expelled. The Consulate in Seattle, U.S.: closed. Everything is part of a sanction policy implemented by the West against Russia. This time an alleged or fake poisoning of a former Russian spy and his daughter by the expressed consent of Vladimir Putin, President of Russia, took place in the British park of Salisbury, as confirmed at first.

Since British PM Theresa May announced the news and confirmed the responsibility of Moscow in the poisoning, the support of the U.S., France, and two dozens of European heads of state — most of them members of NATO — came swiftly. All of them “pointed at” Moscow, with no evidence, as the responsible of the event.

In short, this is another empty threat of the West, which has unleashed such an aggressive stance since the fascist setback in Ukraine some years ago. They bombed the Russian-speaking citizens in bordering regions of Ukraine and Russia, and rejected the freedom of Crimea to adhere once again to the Russian Federation.

Last April 18th, the United Nations Security Council met once again to analyze the Skripal’s case. But as usual, nothing came to fruition. Although it was stated that Yulia, 33, daughter of former spy Sergei Skripal, is already recovered and her father is getting better. It was also missed out that they were put out of action by the British intelligence so the Russians could not find out the possible truth.

What is significant is how they went from being on the brink of death to a miraculous recovery. Afterwards, as we already said, they vanished both. Moscow described this situation as a virtual kidnapping.

NO RESIGNATION, NO SHAME

In this regard, Russia stated that UK internally attacked the Skripal, added to a media conspiracy. It may lead to the resignation of the British government; not to mention the embarrassment of those countries that fell into the trap. But I do not believe London will resign nor its associates have shame whatsoever.

Thus, the recent document of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) reveals that these people were poisoned with a very pure nerve agent without airing its identity or state publicly that it is named Novichok. They only limit to recognize they were poisoned. Therefore, the speech of Theresa May is clearly dubious to say the least. The “high purity” creates tons of doubts by not eliminating these people.

Hence, it is crystal clear that the political stance followed by several nations was not coherent at all.

The minister of Foreign Affairs of Great Britain, Boris Johnson, who removed a public message incriminating him, blames again Russia for the attacks by saying that “there is no alternative explanation as to what nation is responsible.” It is true that Johnson’s analytical skills are reduced since he cannot have any different idea.

Contrary to his perspective, everything suggests there are many alternative such as the experiments carried out by his own government concerning toxic weapons and the site of the exposing (Salisbury), or the contacts of the former spy with other people interested in chemical weapons. It may well be a self inflicted attack to divert attention from the UK’s serious domestic crisis, violence, and poverty. They also have strong desire to damage the image of the upcoming FIFA World Cup 2018 and to reverse its failures by backing terrorism in Syria, among others.

Police and scientific authorities do not know where the Skripal were poisoned and who did it, how, when, or the probable cause of the survival from a highly lethal substance.

It does not take brains to notice that the sole plausible explanation is that the British government is compromised in the case. Believing without evidence, for the sake of faith, is not convincing at all.

The Skripal’s disappearance is like having them in jail with no communication with their relatives. The UK has destroyed evidence; for instance, the dead animals in the Skripal’s house, which confirmed the procedure to remove all sort of evidence that could have jeopardized an undisputable truth.

It seems they will try to give a secret identity to Sergei and Yulia Skripal. It means they could be eliminated in order to hide the main evidence. And that is a very dangerous tactics that both, the American and British intelligence are proven experts.

Translated by Sergio A. Paneque Diaz / CubaSi Translation Staff

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