Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton Are Weak on Climate Change

The outcome of this year’s presidential election could have major implications in the global fight to combat climate change. 

U.S. citizens head to the ballot box November in order to elect their country’s next president, while global temperatures for 2016 are on track to be the hottest-ever on record.

In the United States, people are taking global warming more seriously than at any point in the past eight years, according to a March Gallup poll which found that 64 percent of the population are worried about global warming – marking an increase of 10 percent from last year.

RELATED: Sanders Trumps Clinton on the Environment and Climate Change

In his Republican presidential nomination acceptance speech last week in Cleveland, Trump vowed to eliminate government-imposed environmental regulations in order to jump-start the U.S. economy, which he argued “is costing our country as much as $2 trillion a year.”

“We are going to lift the restrictions on the production of American energy. This will produce more than $20 trillion in job-creating economic activity over the next four decades,” Trump stated.

Throughout his electoral campaign, Trump has repeatedly advocated for offshore drilling. He has also expressed his support for the Keystone XL pipeline and is a firm supporter of fracking as a strategy to end dependence on imported oil.

Meanwhile, Trump campaign officials have told the media in recents weeks that Harold Hamm, Oklahoma oil and gas mogul, is currently being considered as the country’s energy secretary if Trump becomes elected to the White House.

Trump’s vows to overturn federal restrictions on oil and gas development were also echoed in a speech by Hamm at the RNC earlier this month, in which he advocated for expanded drilling and said too much environmental regulation threatened to limit U.S. oil production.

According to reports, Trump has tapped U.S. Congressman Kevin Cramer of North Dakota, a known climate change skeptic and drilling advocate, to help draw up his campaign energy platform, and picked Indiana Governor Mike Pence, also a climate skeptic, as his running mate.

RELATED: Trump Vows to Unravel Climate Change Policies in Favor of Oil

Following the Republican National Convention, Cramer told members of the media that if elected Trump is unlikely to make climate change a top priority.

"I will tell you this, I think it's quite clear that climate change is not a top-10 worrisome issue for Donald Trump,” E&E news quoted Cramer saying.

Trump made headlines yet again in December 2015 when he told a group of supporters at a rally in South Carolina that climate change is a “hoax”.

“So, Obama's talking about all of this with the global warming and the -- a lot of it's a hoax, it's a hoax. I mean, it's a moneymaking industry, OK? It's a hoax, a lot of it," he said.

Meanwhile, in an interview with Reuters last May, Trump vowed to renegotiate the terms of the U.N. global climate accord, which was agreed upon in Paris in December by nearly 200 nations.

Trump's Democratic rival Hillary Clinton has promised to bolster regulation and increase use of renewable fuels to combat climate change if elected.

However, during her time as Secretary of State, Clinton advocated for fracking abroad around under the department’s Global Shale Gas Initiative.

In emails discovered by The Intercept last May, while leading the State Department Clinton worked closely with fossil fuel companies in order to put pressure on foreign leaders to promote fracking abroad, including in Romania, Bulgaria and Morocco.

Greenpeace estimates that Hillary Clinton's campaign and the Super PAC supporting her have received more than $6.9 million from the fossil fuel industry.

  • Published in World

Bernie Sanders Announces Exit from Democratic Party

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has announced that he will return to his position as an Independent. 

Vanquished Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders announced Tuesday that he plans to withdraw his membership from the Democratic Party, returning to his U.S. Senate seat as an Independent, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal.

“I was elected as an Independent; I’ll stay two years more as an Independent,” Mr. Sanders told Bloomberg Politics during a breakfast in Philadelphia.

RELATED: DNC: Clinton Gets Official Party Nomination Amid Protests

Following the event, a campaign aide with the Vermont senator confirmed the announcement stating, “He ran for president as a Democrat but was elected to a six-year term in the Senate as an independent.”

A poll, conducted June 7-10 – right after Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton obtained the delegate majority to become the Democratic nominee – showed 44 percent would like him to make an independent run for the White House. Some 47 percent said he should not.

Sanders, a self-described "democratic socialist," managed to turn his long-shot run into a mass movement with hard-line proposals to combat wealth inequality, increase access to health care and education, and defend the environment.

Meanwhile, polling surveys indicate a tightening race between Clinton and Republican candidate Donald Trump, suggesting that Clinton will need Sanders supporters in order to win the presidential election in November.

RELATED: DNC Heads Called Sanders 'Stupid,' a 'Mess' and a 'Liar': Leak

During the Democratic primaries Sanders managed to capture 1,894 of 4,763 delegates after garnering 13 million votes in the electoral contest.

Sanders won the states of Colorado, Indiana, Michigan, and New Hampshire leading up to the convention, and nearly won Iowa, which experts point out are all states that could be closely contested by Trump in the general election. Clinton likely will need some portion of Sanders' support to stay competitive in those states.

  • Published in World

More Than 100 Celebs Sign Anti-Trump Manifesto

WASHINGTON – More than 100 actors and musicians have signed a “United Against Hate” manifesto calling on U.S. voters to block Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s path to the White House.

The signatories include actors Julianne Moore, Jane Fonda, Bryan Cranston, Kerry Washington and Neil Patrick Harris, filmmakers Michael Moore and Michael Mann, rapper Macklemore, and musician Moby.

“We believe it is our responsibility to use our platforms to bring attention to the dangers of a Trump presidency, and to the real and present threats of his candidacy,” the manifesto said.

“Donald Trump wants to take our country back to a time when fear excused violence, when greed fueled discrimination, and when the state wrote prejudice against marginalized communities into law,” it said.

Among the groups targeted by Trump’s rhetoric, according to the manifesto, are Mexicans and Latinos, blacks, Muslims, women, Asians, refugees and LGBT people.

“Some of us come from the groups Trump has attacked,” the statement said. “Some of us don’t. But as history has shown, it’s often only a matter of time before the ‘other’ becomes me.

“We call upon every American to join us – to stand together on the right side of history, to use the power of our voice and the power of our vote to defeat Donald Trump and the hateful ideology he represents,” the manifesto said.

  • Published in Culture

Obama Warns Trump Could Win, Slams His Ignorance of the World

WASHINGTON – U.S. President Barack Obama said there was a possibility of Republican Party nominee Donald Trump becoming his successor and warned that the real-estate magnate lacks a basic knowledge of the world and “doesn’t seem to have an interest in learning.”

“Anything is possible,” Obama told The Today Show’s Savannah Guthrie when asked if Trump could be elected in November.

“What I think is scary is a president who doesn’t know their stuff and doesn’t seem to have an interest in learning what they don’t know,” the head of state said in the interview that NBC aired Wednesday morning.

In his press conferences and the Republican debates, Trump has shown he lacks a “basic knowledge about the world, or what a nuclear triad is, or where various countries are, or, you know, the difference between Sunni and Shia in the Muslim world,” Obama said.

“Those are things that he doesn’t know and hasn’t seemed to spend a lot of time trying to find out about.”

He also said the magnate was wrong to assert that he alone can solve the United States’ problems because “that’s not how our founders designed our system.”

“We’re not a government where some strong man orders people around and banishes enemies. I think that it’s important for us to remember that we live in a democracy. And by definition, then, the way we solve problems is by everybody participating and arguing and occasionally having to compromise,” the president said.

Obama, who on Wednesday night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia will make the case for electing his party’s nominee, Hillary Clinton, said Trump “is somebody who likes attention, maybe surprised himself that he got this far” in the presidential race.

“So, my advice to Democrats – and I don’t have to give this advice to Hillary Clinton, because she already knows it – is you stay worried until all those votes are cast and counted,” the president warned.

“One of the dangers in an election like this is that people don’t take the challenge seriously. They stay home. And we end up getting the unexpected,” he added.

  • Published in World

Trump Calls Clinton's Legacy "Death, Destruction, Weakness" in Leaked Speech

CLEVELAND, Ohio - Republican presidential candidate for the White House Donald Trump today will say that his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton left a legacy of "death, destruction and weakness" after serving as Secretary of State during 2009-2013, in his acceptance speech at the Republican Party Convention (RNC).

"Hillary Clinton's legacy does not have to be America's legacy. The problems we face now - poverty and violence at home, war and destruction abroad - will last only as long as we continue relying on the same politicians who created them," says Trump according to the draft speech, which was leaked to reporters in Cleveland, Ohio where the RNC takes place.

Trump lashes out at Clinton's campaign for being a "puppet" of "big business, elite media and major donors" and representing a "rigged system".

"Hillary Clinton's message is that things will never change. My message is that things have to change - and they have to change right now."

Trump, according to the draft, will also criticize Clinton's proposals and legacy in foreign policy, immigration, trade, education and protection of the right to bear arms.

Trump will also propose an immediate suspension on immigration from all countries affected by Jihadist terrorism until the US has improved security mechanisms.

"We must immediately suspend immigration from any nation that has been compromised by terrorism until such time as proven vetting mechanisms have been put in place," Trump will announce according to the draft leaked to the press.

"My opponent has called for a radical 550 percent increase in Syrian refugees on top of existing massive refugee flows coming into our country under President Obama," Trump will state in his speech.

"She proposes this despite the fact that there's no way to screen these refugees in order to find out who they are or where they come from. I only want to admit individuals into our country who will support our values and love our people."

"Anyone who endorses violence, hatred or oppression is not welcome in our country and never will be," he will conclude the topic, according to the draft.

Trump's acceptance speech will wrap up the Republican Convention in Cleveland, an atypical convention marked by some major party figures refusal to attend, Senator Ted Cruz's affront and the controversy over the similarities in the speech held by the magnate's wife Melania and that of Michelle Obama in 2008.

  • Published in World

US may face military coup

The Los Angeles Times published a provocative article written by an American journalist and conservative James Kirchik. It is said that the US will face a military coup, in case Donald Trump becomes President.

Kirchik wrote that the Americans should take a close look at the failed coup attempt in Turkey. He believes in case Trump orders the military to do something 'illegal and irrational', they will have to revolt choosing between obeying the law and serving the authority.

This release seems to be out of line even under traditionally aggressive pre-election rhetoric. Despite Kirchik's opinion, vast majority of the Republicans in the US are sure that namely Hillary Clinton demonstrates law disregard. It can be constantly heard at the Republicans National Convention in Cleveland.

But Kirchik has his own preferences: he is sure that namely Clinton may be entrusted with 'nuclear codes'. What about Trump, as he concluded, 'voters must stop him before the military has to'.

 

Video

US may face military coup

21.07.2016
 


The Los Angeles Times published a provocative article written by an American journalist and conservative James Kirchik. It is said that the US will face a military coup, in case Donald Trump becomes President.

Kirchik wrote that the Americans should take a close look at the failed coup attempt in Turkey. He believes in case Trump orders the military to do something 'illegal and irrational', they will have to revolt choosing between obeying the law and serving the authority.

This release seems to be out of line even under traditionally aggressive pre-election rhetoric. Despite Kirchik's opinion, vast majority of the Republicans in the US are sure that namely Hillary Clinton demonstrates law disregard. It can be constantly heard at the Republicans National Convention in Cleveland.

But Kirchik has his own preferences: he is sure that namely Clinton may be entrusted with 'nuclear codes'. What about Trump, as he concluded, 'voters must stop him before the military has to'.

- See more at: http://www.pravdareport.com/video/21-07-2016/135085-trump-0/#sthash.8Edq5BUY.dpuf

Video

US may face military coup

21.07.2016
 


The Los Angeles Times published a provocative article written by an American journalist and conservative James Kirchik. It is said that the US will face a military coup, in case Donald Trump becomes President.

Kirchik wrote that the Americans should take a close look at the failed coup attempt in Turkey. He believes in case Trump orders the military to do something 'illegal and irrational', they will have to revolt choosing between obeying the law and serving the authority.

This release seems to be out of line even under traditionally aggressive pre-election rhetoric. Despite Kirchik's opinion, vast majority of the Republicans in the US are sure that namely Hillary Clinton demonstrates law disregard. It can be constantly heard at the Republicans National Convention in Cleveland.

But Kirchik has his own preferences: he is sure that namely Clinton may be entrusted with 'nuclear codes'. What about Trump, as he concluded, 'voters must stop him before the military has to'.

- See more at: http://www.pravdareport.com/video/21-07-2016/135085-trump-0/#sthash.8Edq5BUY.dpuf
  • Published in World

Ted Cruz just humiliated Donald Trump by refusing to endorse him during his convention speech

CLEVELAND — During Ted Cruz’s speech at the Republican convention Wednesday night, he conspicuously refused to endorse Donald Trump for president — and attendees were furious.

"I congratulate Donald Trump on winning the nomination last night," Cruz said at the outset of his speech. "And like each of you, I want to see the principles that our party believes prevail in November."

He never mentioned Trump’s name again. And for a while, his speech — which laid out the principles he personally believed in — was very well-received.

But as the speech stretched on without an endorsement, attendees began to repeatedly interrupt Cruz with shouts of "Trump!" and "We want Trump!"

Cruz didn’t give in. And when he wrapped up his endorsement-less remarks, he was booed off the stage in a truly remarkable scene.

Cruz’s remarks were a striking rebuke of the nominee and can only be viewed as a major embarrassment for Trump. And it will be the biggest story of this night of the convention. It’s hard to believe that Trump’s team and the RNC agreed to let Cruz speak without the promise of an endorsement in hand. But that seems to be what ended up happening.

No, Cruz didn’t outright criticize the man he once called "utterly amoral," "a pathological liar," and "a narcissist at a level I don’t think this country has ever seen."

Still, he must have known he’d likely be booed in front of a pro-Trump crowd. And he was willing to take this stance regardless.

What Cruz said

For a striking contrast, watch Scott Walker's speech, delivered half an hour before Cruz's. Walker repeatedly praised Trump without qualification, and attacked Clinton. "We need to support Donald Trump and Mike Pence for President and Vice President," Walker said. He added later: "Let me be clear: a vote for anyone other than Donald Trump in November is a vote for Hillary Clinton."

Cruz did none of that.

He began by telling a moving story about Caroline Smith, the daughter of one of the police officers killed in Dallas earlier this month. According to Cruz, Smith said that, on the day he died, her father asked her, "What if this is the last time you ever kiss or hug me?"

Then Cruz transitioned to the big picture: "What if this, right now, is our last time? Our last moment to do something for our families and our country?"

He proceeded to lay out the principles he himself believed in, in what effectively amounted to the first speech of his 2020 presidential campaign. He framed it around "freedom" — "freedom to choose your child's education," "to choose your own doctor," and "to provide for your family without the IRS beating down your door," among other things.

But overall, the speech seemed designed to encourage attendees — and, perhaps more importantly, viewers at home — to envision what it would be like to have Cruz, rather than Trump, as the head of the party.

Cruz thinks he's Ronald Reagan in 1976

It's pretty clear that Cruz believes his loss in this primary was similar to Ronald Reagan's near miss in 1976 — a near miss that will position him well to take over the party and lead it to a sweeping national landslide victory four years later.

In reality, it's not clear how similar the two situations are. Reagan came so close to Gerald Ford in the delegate count that year that, when the convention began, it was legitimately unclear who would be the nominee.

But Cruz only won four primaries and five caucuses — and quit the race over two months ago. Plus, when he quit, his popularity among GOP voters was plummeting. What's more, Cruz isn't the only person hoping to capitalize on an expected Trump loss — there's also Marco Rubio, Tom Cotton, and Ben Sasse in the Senate alone.

To further the comparison, check out the famous speech Reagan gave at the convention after his 1976 loss, apparently impromptu. In relatable yet moving rhetoric, Reagan warned about two dangers: the erosion of freedom, and the risk of nuclear destruction. The speech was rapturously received by delegates.

Cruz's speech Wednesday night was also rapturously received — at first. But when it became clear he wasn't going to endorse Trump, the crowd turned against him. Reagan didn't leave to loud boos, he left to big cheers. This was quite different.

Cruz has cast his lot with anti-Trump conservatives

It's well-known that Cruz loathes Trump personally. Trump is the man who dubbed him "Lyin' Ted," who attacked his wife, and who ludicrously suggested that his father had something to do with the JFK assassination.

Still, many political observers expected him to come around and offer either a de facto endorsement or an outright one, perhaps emphasizing the importance of party unity and defeating Hillary Clinton.

That's especially true because it's clear Cruz wants to be the Republican nominee in 2020. As Politico's Shane Goldmacher reported, Cruz's team has already embarked upon a review of all their campaign decisions this year, to better set up for a likely 2020 run should Trump lose (or, perhaps, some speculate, even a primary challenge against Trump should he win). And to win, he'll need to convert some of Trump's voters.

But Cruz didn't endorse the billionaire. Unlike Rubio, Walker, Pence, and so many others with 2020 ambitions, he took a stand, even though it meant loud boos. He's betting that his party isn't the party of Trump. We'll see if he's right.

 

  • Published in World

Trump Officially Nominated as GOP Presidential Candidate

During Tuesday afternoon’s roll call vote, Trump – who was not present for the balloting of delegates by state – managed to garner more than the 1,237 votes required to secure the party nomination.

CLEVELAND – Real estate magnate Donald Trump was officially nominated on Tuesday as the Republican Party’s presidential candidate for the November election at the GOP Convention in Cleveland, Ohio.

During Tuesday afternoon’s roll call vote, Trump – who was not present for the balloting of delegates by state – managed to garner more than the 1,237 votes required to secure the party nomination.

The brash billionaire businessman’s home state of New York was the one that put him over the 1,237-vote threshold and, by and large, the balloting was clear and even surprising evidence of unity in a party that just on Monday appeared to be driven with dissension and unrest among the “Never Trump” or anti-Trump faction.

The roll call of the states proceeded alphabetically and Trump’s oldest child, Donald Jr., accompanied by his sister Ivanka and brother Eric, read the 89-6 tally for the New York state delegates that handed his father the presidential nomination at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland.

Although Trump’s pick for his running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, must also be confirmed by a roll call vote at the Convention, this was likely to be a mere formality and all that remains is for Trump to accept the party’s decision on Thursday in his speech closing out the conclave that began on Monday.

No significant protests or dissension arose during the roll call vote, in contrast to what was seen on Monday when rebel delegates fruitlessly tried to derail the Trump juggernaut by demanding a change in the rules governing the candidate selection process.

Senators Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio, obtained a marginal number of votes in the states where local rules allow delegates to vote for candidates who are absent from the convention proceedings.

  • Published in World
Subscribe to this RSS feed