Bolivian Government Provides Aid for Rain Victims

Deputy Minister of Civil Defense Carlos Brú affirmed that the Bolivian government guarantees assistance to all those affected by the heavy rains that affect several departments of the country.

Brú added that the exact damages of the emergency are not still quantified because it is a developing phenomenon, while reiterating the government's willingness to help the victims.

He commented that, along with other institutions, the Vice Ministry of Civil Defense helps with the delivery of food, habitable tents and supports the deployment of the Armed Forces troops in the affected areas.

The official highlighted the timely disaster response system in Bolivia which is organized from the municipal, departmental and national levels.

In his appearance in the program El pueblo es noticia of Bolivia TV, he reiterated the call to the population made by the president, Evo Morales, that the first thing is to save life and then material goods.

The latest report from the authorities estimated that the families affected by the floods and landslides stands at 14,900.

Likewise, the main departments affected are La Paz, Beni, Chuquisaca, Cochabamba, Potosí and Tarija.

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Philippines- Death Toll From Cebu Floods Rises to Ten

The death toll from the flash floods in the province of Cebu in Philippines has risen to ten and many are injured today.

Heavy rains poured nonstop over the province of Cebu on Sunday and submerged homes in the municipality of Carmen.70 families were displaced and 10 thousand were evacuated. The municipality is the hardest hit area.

Houses were damaged, fields were flattened, and trees were uprooted in Brgy. In Carmen the river overflowed, following raging waters from the mountain. Some of the residents survived by climbing to trees.

The local government has been busy distributing relief goods among the flood victims and the rescue operations continue.

During the reany season from June to Nov. an average of 20 typhons hit the islands leaving behind many dead and displaced people.

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Hundreds stranded in North Carolina floods after Hurricane Matthew

The rivers were expected to crest early this week, with a few areas surpassing previous records.

FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. - (AP) - Matthew is long gone from the Atlantic coast early Monday, but the devastation lingers, most notably in North Carolina, where flooded cities are trying to dry out and those downstream are keeping a close eye on rising rivers.

"This is still an extremely unsafe situation", McCrory said. "Our models show very, very risky conditions as those rivers go over their edges". The Lumber River in Lumberton was 4 feet above its record level Sunday afternoon and was forecast to remain there for at least five days.

Matthew sideswiped hundreds of miles of the USA coastline from Florida through Georgia and the Carolinas, its eye staying far enough offshore that the damage in many places along the coast was relatively modest, consisting mostly of flooded streets, flattened trees and blown-down signs and awnings.

According to Haiti's Civil Protection Service, more than 330 people were killed but some media outlets citied figures from local officials that claimed the death toll exceeded 800.

They heard her cries for help while riding on top of a Humvee, and when they couldn't get her with a rope, a National Guard soldier swam to her, staying until a rescue boat arrived, Emergency Management Director Gordon Deno, said. The agency warned that floodwater could be charged by downed power lines or could hide unsafe debris.

McCrory said 334 rescue workers risked their lives carrying out 877 rescues overnight.

Frenel said 522 people died in Grand'Anse alone. Most were swept away by flood waters. "At night it is deadly". And, he said, "Trees are down in every neighborhood on nearly every road".

The precise death toll remains uncertain. "The power of water can kill people". "Turn around, don't drown".

South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley on Sunday lifted evacuation orders in four counties, saying residents in another two may be allowed back on Monday.

Even after the storm was downgraded to a post-tropical cyclone on Sunday and it moved out to sea, officials warned that the worst is not over.

The storm still packed hurricane force winds as far as 90 miles (150 km) from the center and tropical-storm-force winds 240 miles (390 km) away.U.S. President Barack Obama declared a state of emergency in Georgia and Florida, freeing up federal money to help the states fix damaged infrastructure and remove debris.

On Sunday, the most powerful Atlantic storm since 2007 unleashed torrential rains and powerful winds as it churned slowly north after pummelling the southeastern coast of the United States, killing at least 11 people in Florida, Georgia and North Carolina since Thursday and leaving more than two million businesses and homes without power.

In Haiti, where the storm killed hundreds of people: "A massive relief effort is being mounted for hurricane-ravaged parts of Haiti", NPR's Jason Beaubien reports from Port au Prince, "with President Obama urging Americans to give whatever they can".

The storm sideswiped hundreds of miles of US coastline from Florida to the Carolinas, but its eye remained far enough offshore that the coastline damage in many places was relatively modest, consisting mostly of flooded streets, flattened trees and blown-down signs and awnings. By the time the storm hit Charleston, S.C., it was a Category 1 hurricane, but the historic port city still faced a 6-foot storm surge, severe flooding and fallen trees.

An estimated 2 million people in the Southeast were ordered to evacuate their homes as Matthew closed in.

The storm left 1000 people dead in Haiti, and on Monday United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said some Haitian towns and villages had been nearly wiped off the map.

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Hurricane Matthew: Category Four storm pounds Haiti

The most powerful Caribbean hurricane in nearly a decade has hit Haiti, bringing 145mph (230km/h) winds, heavy rain and dangerous storm surges.

Hurricane Matthew, a Category Four storm, made landfall at the south-western tip at about 11:00 GMT.

The US National Hurricane Center (NHC) said Haiti was "getting everything a major hurricane can throw at them".

Reports from the southern coast spoke of communities under water and buildings stripped of roofs.

Marie Alta Jean-Baptiste, director of the country's Civil Protection Agency, told Associated Press: "It's much too early to know how bad things are but we do know there are a lot of houses that have been destroyed or damaged in the south."

One resident too ill to leave their home was killed when waves struck in the town of Port Salut.

Haiti's Interim President Jocelerme Privert said earlier that some people at sea or who had not "respected alerts" had died, but he gave no figures.

Haiti is one of the world's poorest countries and many of its residents live in wooden or corrugated steel shacks in areas prone to flooding. Matthew is expected to bring up to 40in (102cm) of rain to some parts as it moves north at about 15km/h.

Social media footage from the southern coastal town of Les Cayes showed palm trees being bent sideways and buildings with roofs sheared off buildings.

American journalist Jacqueline Charles told the BBC from the capital, Port-au-Prince, that reports from Les Cayes spoke of people walking in water shoulder high, with relief workers saying that other coastal communities were also under water.

Fonie Pierre, director of Catholic Relief Services for Les Cayes, told AP: "Many people are now asking for help, but it's too late because there is no way to go evacuate them."

The mayor of Les Cayes, Jean Gabriel Fortune, posted tweets that included video showing damage in the Vernet area.

A major road was swamped in Les Anglais, while the mayor of Tiburon, Remiza Denize, spoke of large waves hitting the town.

"Everyone is trying to find a safe place to protect themselves, the situation is very difficult."

Fear of thefts

Haitian officials say that about 1,300 emergency shelters have been built, enough to accommodate 340,000 people. Both airports in Haiti are closed.


But some Haitians have refused to go to shelters, fearful of having their possessions stolen.

One local in Port-au-Prince, however, said the community would unite in the face of the storm's danger.

"We are communicating amongst ourselves thanks to our own means. We will tell the people how the situation is. If things are bad then we will come together."

Authorities had urged people to stock up on food and water and secure their homes.

An NHC statement said: "On the forecast track, the eye of Matthew will move near eastern Cuba later [on Tuesday], and move near or over portions of the south-eastern and central Bahamas [on Tuesday night] and Wednesday, and approach the north-western Bahamas on Wednesday night."

About 13,000 people were evacuated from high-risk areas in neighbouring Dominican Republic, which is also expected to get battered by rains and winds, according to the country's civil defence chief.

Heavy rain and winds have already hit parts of Jamaica, with floodwaters blocking roads in the capital Kingston.

A hurricane alert is in place for six eastern Cuban provinces and residents are being moved from low-lying areas.

Some 700 spouses and children of US service members have been flown out of the Guantanamo Bay base, which is just 80km from where the storm could make landfall.

It is also predicted to hit the US east coast later in the week. Florida and parts of North Carolina have declared states of emergency.

Hurricane Matthew is the region's most powerful since Felix in 2007.

Hurricane scales

Category one: sustained winds of 74-95mph (119-153 km/h); some damage and power cuts

Category two: winds of 96-110mph (154-177 km/h); extensive damage

Category three: winds of 111-129mph (178-208 km/h); well-built homes suffer major damage

Category four: winds of 130-156mph (209-251 km/h); severe damage to well-built homes, most trees snapped or uprooted

Category five: winds of 157 mph (252 km/h) or higher; high percentage of homes destroyed, area uninhabitable for weeks or months

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