Four people, including boy, killed in New York City shooting

(Reuters) - Four people, including a young boy, were shot and killed on Monday in a New York City apartment, police said.

Two females, one male and a boy, about five years old, were found dead from gunshot wounds inside the apartment in the borough of Queens, after police and emergency crews were called to the scene a little before 9 p.m., New York City Police Department Chief of Detectives Dermot Shea told a news conference.

Police are investigating if the shooting was a murder-suicide, Shea said.

“We will take the evidence where ever it leads us,” he said. “We don’t want to leave any stone unturned.”

 

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Crime in Mexico City Is on the Rise

Mexico, Jul 30 (Prensa Latina) Mexico City (CDMX) registered an increase in violent crimes with 600 cases in the last six months, an average of 3.3 daily, according to data released.

According to statistics from the Attorney General's Office of the CDMX, the first semester of this 2018 has been the most violent, as 600 investigation folders were opened for the crime of intentional homicide.

The figure represents 66 percent more than that registered in the first semester of 2014, year in which 361 investigative folders for murders were opened.

For four years the trend of intentional homicides has been increasing, said the Attorney General's Office of the capital.

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Gunman kills two, injures 12 on bustling Toronto avenue, police say

TORONTO (Reuters) - A gunman opened fire on a Toronto street filled with people in restaurants late on Sunday, killing two people and injuring 12 others, including a young girl, authorities said. The suspected shooter was later found dead.

The girl was in a critical condition, Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders said.

“We are looking at all possible motives ... and not closing any doors,” Saunders told reporters at the site of the shooting.

Paramedics, firefighters and police converged on the scene in Toronto’s east end.

https://s1.reutersmedia.net/resources/r/?m=02&d=20180723&t=2&i=1286232333&r=LYNXMPEE6M112&w=940People leave an area taped off by the police near the scene of a mass shooting in Toronto, Canada, July 22, 2018. REUTERS/Chris Helgren

Police said the gunman used a handgun. Earlier reports said nine people had been shot.

The gunfire on Danforth Avenue in the city’s Greektown neighborhood began at 10 p.m. local time (0200 GMT Monday), the Special Investigations Unit said, adding that the gunman walked down the busy avenue firing at groups of people.

Danforth is filled with restaurants and a family-friendly night life.

The gunman, a 29-year-old man, exchanged fire with police, fled and was later found dead, according to the Special Investigations Unit, which investigates deaths and injuries involving police.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Twitter on Monday, “The people of Toronto are strong, resilient and brave - and we’ll be there to support you through this difficult time.”

Toronto Mayor John Tory told reporters the city has a gun problem, with weapons too readily available to too many people. Tory is expected to brief city councilors on Monday morning.

Toronto is grappling with a sharp rise in gun violence this year. Deaths from gun violence has jumped 53 percent to 26 so far in 2018 from the same period last year, police data last week showed, with the number of shootings rising 13 percent.

Toronto has deployed about 200 police officers since July 20 in response to the recent spate in shootings, which city officials have blamed on gang violence.

In April, a driver deliberately plowed his white Ryder rental van into a lunch-hour crowd in Toronto, killing 10 people and injuring 15 along a roughly mile-long (1.6-km) stretch of sidewalk thronged with pedestrians.

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Colombia: UN Condemns Leaders' Murder After Double Homicide

At least 100 social leaders have been killed since January, the Institute of Study on Peace and Development (Indepaz) and the Patriotic Mach reported.

The United Nations condemned the rising violence targeting Colombian social leaders after police discovered the bodies of two missing activists in Santander, Colombia Saturday.

RELATED: Four Social Leaders, Activists Killed in Colombia in 24 Hours

The remains of Bellavista’s 37-year old president of the Community Action Board (JAC), Isaac Navarro Mora, and Hector Santiago Anteliz, 52, were found riddled with bullets abandoned on the roadside in Teorama Saturday morning.

Authorities report both Navarro and his wife, Luz Bella Reyes, were kidnapped Friday night following a social event. Police say that though they are pursuing multiple lines of investigation, they believe the pair were killed by motorcyclists and rogue members of Colombia's former guerrilla groups.

In response to Santiago’s death, also a JAC president, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees tweeted, “We condemn the homicide of Héctor Santiago Anteliz, 52 years old, president of the JAC of San Jose, Teorama, in Norte de Santander. In 2018, we have documented 9 defenders' homicides in this department. #NiUnoMas #colombia #DDHH.”

At least 100 social leaders since January, the Institute of Study on Peace and Development (Indepaz) and the Patriotic Mach reported in a study released earlier this month during the Agrarian Summit.

According to the figures of the document, January was the month in which more murders of leaders reached 27 followed by March with 21, May 18, February 17 and- according to teleSur’s Manuel Jimenez, within the first 5 days of June, 7 leaders had already been killed.

Arauca, Cauca, Antioquia, Norte de Santander, Santander, Valle del Cauca, Nariño were described as the most dangerous for social leaders, registering the highest number of murders.

Multiple human rights organizations have urged the Colombian government to implement more effective measures to preserve the lives of social leaders.

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85% of world's 1bn firearms held by civilians, study shows

As many as 85 percent of the world's one billion legal and illicit firearms are held by civilians – far exceeding the number of those held by modern armed forces and law enforcement agencies, a Swiss-based think tank revealed.

There are roughly one billion firearms in the world, and the vast majority of them are in civilian – not military – hands, according to a new study by a think tank in Switzerland.

The Small Arms Survey, which provides research and expertise on weapons proliferation and armed violence, examined the ownership of automatic pistols and revolvers, rifles, carbines, assault rifles and sub- and light-machine guns, held by civilian, military and law enforcement entities.

 
Patti Sapone

A total of 857 million firearms, both legal and illicit, are estimated to be held by civilians, including individuals, private security companies, non-state armed groups and gangs. The US topped the list of heaviest-armed nations, with its citizens possessing 393 million weapons. The figure means that there are roughly 121 guns for every 100 Americans.

Trailing far behind their American counterparts are Indians, who own 71 million guns, and the Chinese, who possess over 49 million firearms.

"The key to the United States, of course, is its unique gun culture," said Aaron Karp, the author of the study. Americans, the study notes, are inclined to own arms converted from military variants.

"As of 2016, 42.3 percent of hunters and shooters were reported owning at least one AR15 platform (M16-style rifle) or semi-automatic assault weapon such as AR15- or Kalashnikov-style rifle," it says.

Discussions about gun control, mental health, and law enforcement powers have dominated public discourse in the US from time to time, quickly becoming relevant in light of mass shootings or gun-related violence. Some observers raised concerns over easy access to civilian-issue weapons in the United States.

"It's insane, and you know, we license cars. You can't just get in a car and drive it," Dave Lindorff, an investigative journalist, told RT. "But you can get a gun and shoot it. You don't need any training, you don't need any licensing," he added, referring to the "nuttiness" of some state legislation allowing concealed carry.

Interestingly, the number of guns in military arsenals is far less impressive, the paper shows. Stockpiles belonging to armed forces in 177 countries contained at least 133 million firearms. Russia, China, North Korea, Ukraine and the US combined have the largest stockpiles of small arms.

The Russian military possessed the largest military firearms arsenal (30.3 million), but announced the disposal of over 10 million weapons back in 2010, including four million Kalashnikov assault rifles, the Small Arms Survey stressed.

READ MORE: US military spending grew for 1st time in 6 years in 2016 – study

Many military-owned firearms had made their way to non-state – and often illicit – markets, the researchers warned. Collapse of state authority, like the one that happened after the US-led 2003 invasion in Iraq, saw terrorist groupings seizing weapons from government arsenals.

Another 22.7 million firearms were held by law enforcement agencies worldwide, making up a tiny two percent of all small arms in the world. Whereas the US was dominant in civilian-gun ownership, the report said that the country was only fifth in law enforcement holdings, behind Russia, China, India and Egypt.

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Fifty Religious Groups Demand Gun Control in U.S.

Washington, Nov 13 (Prensa Latina) While the debate about gun control is still open in the United States today, local media published a letter in which 50 religious organizations demand that Congress take actions on gun violence.

The groups, which make up the Faiths United to Prevent Gun Violence Coalition, called for Congress to 'take immediate action to curb the onslaught of gun violence plaguing our nation.'

The coalition noted the shootings that have taken place at houses of worship in recent years, including the 2015 church shooting in Charleston, South Carolina, and the shooting at the Sikh Temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, in 2012.

In the letter, addressed to the Republican and Democratic leadership in the House of Representatives and the Senate and published on the website of The Hill, the groups noted, 'It is horrifying that innocents were massacred in a house of worship once again, a terrifying reality for all people of faith in this country who believe that their congregations are sanctuaries of peace, safety, life, and love.'

'We would welcome the opportunity to discuss our coalition's legislative priorities with you. All people in our beloved country deserve to feel safe in their houses of worship and their communities; inaction is immoral and wrong,' says the letter.

In the document, the groups called on Congress to take action to close loopholes that allow domestic violence offenders to own and buy guns, implement a universal background check system and pass an assault weapons ban, among other demands.

The letter on gun control was published when democrats and several social sectors are calling to take actions to prevent gun violence after the shooting in Texas and the worst shooting in U.S. history, as a result of which 58 people were killed in Las Vegas, Nevada, on October 1.

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Two Killed In San Francisco Shooting Spree, Police Arrest A 61-Year-Old

San Francisco:  At least two people were killed and three others injured in a shooting spree in San Francisco, police said.

The shooting took place on Monday in Clearlake Oaks in Lake County, CBS San Francisco reported.

According to authorities, Clearlake resident 61-year-old Alan Ashmore was arrested on two counts of homicide as well as multiple other counts of assault with a firearm following the late Monday morning shooting spree.

Authorities were trying to determine a motive in the seemingly random shooting spree.

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Brazil: Barbarity Takes Over Prisons with 130 Deaths

Cruelty finally seemed to take over Brazilian prisons, where in the first two weeks of this year more than 130 prisoners were killed, most of them being slit or charred.

'The scene was a barbarity. They were decapitated bodies. Much destruction 'are the impressions of the Secretary of Justice and Citizenship of Rio Grande do Norte, Wallber Virgolino da Silva, after the massacre occurred in Alcazuz penitentiary, the largest in the state and where 26 inmates were killed yesterday.

Expert witnesses confirmed Da Silva's appreciation and confirmed that all of the dead were decapitated or charred. In all cases, the experts added, the corpses had sharp object marks and apparently, none had any traces of shots.

The prison of Alcazuz was shaken for 14 hours by a revolt that began on Saturday afternoon and could only be stifled the day before after military police forces, including shock troops and the Special Operations Battalion, could enter the area of the disturbances in a quiet way.

This was the largest massacre recorded in the history of the prison system in Rio Grande do Norte and, according to the Secretary of Public Security and Social Defense Caio César Bezerra, the outbreak occurred when prisoners invaded another one of a rival faction to massacre their opponents.

At the Paraná State Penitentiary of Piraquara, located in the metropolitan region of Curitiba, 28 prisoners were fleeing and two killed yesterday in clashes with police trying to stop the stampede.

So far this year, riots in Brazilian prisons have killed at least 134 inmates, more than a third of all murders recorded last year in the precincts (372).

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