Delhi Recorded an All-Time High Temperature at 48 Degrees Celsius

New Delhi temperature broke record, when the mercury touched a historical maximum of 48 degrees Celsius in parts of the national capital.

The severe heat waves continue affecting north and central India, with record high temperatures in many cities.

In Uttar Pradesh, Banda was the hottest area on Monday at 49.2 degrees Celsius, seven degrees above normal. In Churu, Rajasthan, temperature recorded at 50.3 degrees Celsius and the Medical Department issued a warning not to go outside, except in emergency situations.

The southwest winds for Tuesday can make the temperature drop one or two marks. However, the heat wave will persist, the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) regional weather forecasting chief, Kuldeep Srivastava, said.

Meteorologists declare a heat wave in large areas when the mercury touches 45 degree Celsius for two consecutive days and a severe heat wave is declared when the temperature rises to 47 degrees Celsius for two days.

For small areas, such as New Delhi, a heat wave is declared if the maximum temperature is recorded at 45 degrees Celsius even for one day, the IMD said.

  • Published in World

Research predicts extreme fires will increasingly be part of our global landscape

Increasingly dangerous fire weather is forecast as the global footprint of extreme fires expands, according to the latest research.

University of Tasmania Professor of Environmental Change Biology David Bowman led an international collaboration - including researchers from the University of Idaho and South Dakota State University - to compile a global satellite database of the intensity of 23 million landscape fires between 2002 and 2013.

Of the 23 million fires, researchers honed in on 478 of the most extreme wildfire events.

"Extreme fire events are a global and natural phenomenon, particularly in forested areas that have pronounced dry seasons," Professor Bowman said.

"With the exception of land clearance, the research found that extremely intense fires are associated with anomalous weather - such as droughts, winds, or in desert regions, following particularly wet seasons.

"Of the top 478 events we identified 144 economically and socially disastrous extreme fire events that were concentrated in regions where humans have built into flammable forested landscapes, such as areas surrounding cities in southern Australia and western North America."

Using climate change model projections to investigate the likely consequences of climate change, the research found more extreme fires are predicted in the future for Australia's east coast, including Brisbane, and the whole of the Mediterranean region - Portugal, Spain, France, Greece and Turkey.

"The projections suggest an increase in the days conducive to extreme wildfire events by 20 to 50 per cent in these disaster-prone landscapes, with sharper increases in the subtropical Southern Hemisphere, and the European Mediterranean Basin," Professor Bowman said.

University of Idaho Assistant Professor Crystal Kolden said the United States had a much higher proportion of fire events become disasters than any other country in the study. Wildfire burned more than 10 million acres in the US in 2015, and cost over $2 billion to suppress.

"What is really novel about this study is that in the US, we tend to make the assumption that all large and intense fires are disasters, and that there is nothing we can do about it," Assistant Professor Kolden said.

"The projections suggest an increase in the days conducive to extreme wildfire events by 20 to 50 per cent in these disaster-prone landscapes, with sharper increases in the subtropical Southern Hemisphere, and the European Mediterranean Basin," Professor Bowman said.

University of Idaho Assistant Professor Crystal Kolden said the United States had a much higher proportion of fire events become disasters than any other country in the study. Wildfire burned more than 10 million acres in the US in 2015, and cost over $2 billion to suppress.

"What is really novel about this study is that in the US, we tend to make the assumption that all large and intense fires are disasters, and that there is nothing we can do about it," Assistant Professor Kolden said.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-02-extreme-increasingly-global-landscape.html#jCp

University of Tasmania Professor of Environmental Change Biology David Bowman led an international collaboration - including researchers from the University of Idaho and South Dakota State University - to compile a global satellite database of the intensity of 23 million landscape fires between 2002 and 2013.

Of the 23 million fires, researchers honed in on 478 of the most extreme wildfire events.

"Extreme fire events are a global and natural phenomenon, particularly in forested areas that have pronounced dry seasons," Professor Bowman said.

"With the exception of land clearance, the research found that extremely intense fires are associated with anomalous weather - such as droughts, winds, or in desert regions, following particularly wet seasons.

"Of the top 478 events we identified 144 economically and socially disastrous extreme fire events that were concentrated in regions where humans have built into flammable forested landscapes, such as areas surrounding cities in southern Australia and western North America."

Using model projections to investigate the likely consequences of climate change, the research found more extreme fires are predicted in the future for Australia's east coast, including Brisbane, and the whole of the Mediterranean region - Portugal, Spain, France, Greece and Turkey.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-02-extreme-increasingly-global-landscape.html#jCp

University of Tasmania Professor of Environmental Change Biology David Bowman led an international collaboration - including researchers from the University of Idaho and South Dakota State University - to compile a global satellite database of the intensity of 23 million landscape fires between 2002 and 2013.

Of the 23 million fires, researchers honed in on 478 of the most extreme wildfire events.

"Extreme fire events are a global and natural phenomenon, particularly in forested areas that have pronounced dry seasons," Professor Bowman said.

"With the exception of land clearance, the research found that extremely intense fires are associated with anomalous weather - such as droughts, winds, or in desert regions, following particularly wet seasons.

"Of the top 478 events we identified 144 economically and socially disastrous extreme fire events that were concentrated in regions where humans have built into flammable forested landscapes, such as areas surrounding cities in southern Australia and western North America."

Using model projections to investigate the likely consequences of climate change, the research found more extreme fires are predicted in the future for Australia's east coast, including Brisbane, and the whole of the Mediterranean region - Portugal, Spain, France, Greece and Turkey.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-02-extreme-increasingly-global-landscape.html#jCp

University of Tasmania Professor of Environmental Change Biology David Bowman led an international collaboration - including researchers from the University of Idaho and South Dakota State University - to compile a global satellite database of the intensity of 23 million landscape fires between 2002 and 2013.

Of the 23 million fires, researchers honed in on 478 of the most extreme wildfire events.

"Extreme fire events are a global and natural phenomenon, particularly in forested areas that have pronounced dry seasons," Professor Bowman said.

"With the exception of land clearance, the research found that extremely intense fires are associated with anomalous weather - such as droughts, winds, or in desert regions, following particularly wet seasons.

"Of the top 478 events we identified 144 economically and socially disastrous extreme fire events that were concentrated in regions where humans have built into flammable forested landscapes, such as areas surrounding cities in southern Australia and western North America."

Using model projections to investigate the likely consequences of climate change, the research found more extreme fires are predicted in the future for Australia's east coast, including Brisbane, and the whole of the Mediterranean region - Portugal, Spain, France, Greece and Turkey.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-02-extreme-increasingly-global-landscape.html#jCp

NASA spots Tropical Storm Howard developing in Eastern Pacific

Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite showed strong thunderstorms within the ninth tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean, as the storm was strengthening. Early on Aug. 1 Tropical Depression 9E intensified into a tropical storm and was renamed Howard.

Tropical Storm Howard, the ninth tropical cyclone to develop in 30 days in the Eastern Pacific is also the eighth named storm of the 2016 season. Tropical Depression 1E in June was the only tropical cyclone that developed this season and did not reach status.

On July 31, at 5:05 p.m. EDT (9:05 p.m. UTC) the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured on Tropical Depression 9E. The AIRS data showed that the coldest cloud top temperatures of at least minus 63 F (minus 53 C) and strongest thunderstorms circled the low-level center with the exception of the northern quadrant of the storm. Strong storms also fed into the low level center from a band of thunderstorms southwest of the center.

Over the course of 12 hours, the cloud pattern of the cyclone improved. At 5 a.m. EDT (9: a.m. UTC) on Aug. 1, the depression became a tropical storm. At that time, Tropical Storm Howard's maximum sustained winds were near 40 mph (65 kph) with higher gusts. The center of Tropical Storm Howard was located near 16.1 degrees north latitude and 122.9 degrees west longitude, about 965 miles (1,555 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. Since Howard is far enough away from land areas there are no coastal watches or warnings in effect.

The National Hurricane Center NHC said that Howard was moving toward the west-northwest near 10 mph (17 kph) and this general motion is expected to continue for the next couple of days. The estimated minimum central pressure was 1,005 millibars.

The NHC forecast indicated that some additional strengthening is forecast today and Tuesday morning. Then, gradual weakening is expected to begin by Tuesday night and Wednesday when Howard moves over cooler water.

2 planes collide at Minsk Airport due to stormy weather

Several planes have been damaged by a storm at the airport in the capital of Belarus, with two aircraft colliding on the airfield. There have been no reports of injuries.

The planes that collided belong to the Belarusian Belavia Airlines and the Ruby Star Air Carrier Company, pictures posted on social media show. Belavia officials have already confirmed to the local media that the company’s airplanes were hit by the storm.

“There are problems in the airport because of the storm,” a Belavia representative told Belorussian Tut.by news portal, adding that “some aircraft are damaged, including ours.”

"There are no dead or injured from the incident,” the company representatives added.

There were no passengers onboard the two planes that collided, the Belavia press service told journalists.

The airport press service said that several windows in the airport terminal had been smashed and a suspended ceiling system was deformed in several places due to rough wind and heavy rains.

Several flights were also re-routed to alternate airport in the Belorussian city of Gomel, and another was re-routed to the city of Vilnius in neighboring Lithuania.

The airport now is now operating as usual, the press service added.

  • Published in World
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