50 Dead In Hurricane Dorian, 90 Per Cent Infrastructure Damaged In Bahamas

"Communities such as The Mudd and Pigeon Pea, where 70 percent of informal housing in Abaco existed, and where an overwhelming majority of Haitian migrants resided, has been decimated," it said in a statement.

"The Mudd is gone," said IOM's Brian Kelly, who is leading the UN Disaster Assessment and Coordination team in the area.

The Haitians migrants "are in a very tough situation, just as many of the Bahamians," he said.

Some 90 percent of housing and infrastructure is damaged or destroyed on Abaco, the World Food Programme (WFP) said in a statement, reporting thousands of houses leveled, telecommunications towers down and roads blocked.

Approximately 76,000 people were affected by Dorian, the IOM said, citing official reports. Of these, thousands have been evacuated and about 860 are in emergency shelters in the capital city of Nassau.

"The rest of the people remain in the affected areas," said Vynliz Dailey, IOM assessment mission officer.

An estimated 5,000 people had been evacuated by the Bahamas, the WFP said, citing data provided by the government.

The organization said it had distributed 1,000 tarpaulin coats to serve as temporary roofs for destroyed homes in Marsh Harbour while the World Food Programme said it had passed out more than 1,500 ready-to-eat meals, after offloading 13,800 at Marsh Harbour.

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UN ‘estimates’ death toll in Yemen war surpassed 10,000

The death toll in the Yemeni conflict has surpassed 10,000 people, according to “estimates” from a senior UN official, amidst the ongoing chaos in the war-torn country suffering a tremendous humanitarian disaster.

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“I don’t know the figures but the estimates are that over 10,000 people have been killed in this conflict and almost 40,000 people injured,” UN Yemen Humanitarian Coordinator Jamie McGoldrick told the reporters at a press conference in Sanaa.

Read more Over 4,000 civilians killed, aid blocked, zero accountability – HRW’s wrap up of Yemen war

A Houthi armed man walks past destroyed houses in the old quarter of the northwestern city of Saada, Yemen January 11, 2017 © Naif Rahma

The estimates seem to be pretty rough, since McGoldrick stated in August last year that “at least 10,000 people” had been killed in the protracted conflict.

Previous estimates voiced by McGoldrick were based on “official information” from medical facilities in Yemen, but now, many areas in the war-ravaged country have no medical facilities left. Both local and internationally-supported hospitals have been struck by Saudi-led coalition planes in numerous incidents often blamed on “mistakes” and “bad intelligence.” The statistics are scarce as the dead are often buried without any official records.

“This is a war of aggression being waged by Saudi Arabia. Civilians are being targeted, they are not simply collateral damage,” Brian Becker, National coordinator of the ANSWER coalition told RT.

While McGoldrick gave no breakdown on civilian casualties, October figures from the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), states the conflict has claimed the lives of at least 4,125 civilians and left at least 7,207 wounded, with the majority of the casualties caused by coalition airstrikes.

READ MORE: Over 4,000 civilians killed, aid blocked, zero accountability – HRW’s wrap up of Yemen war

“These people are committing war crimes routinely, systematically against the people of Yemen. This amounts to Holocaust, not just war crimes it’s Holocaust,” Kim Sharif, a human rights lawyer and director of Human Rights for Yemen, told RT.

“There are about 11 million people in this country who need some sort of protection in terms of human rights, to protect their dignity and their safety,” McGoldrick added at the press conference.

Yemen’s population in 2013 was estimated around 25 million people, which means that roughly a half of Yemenis experience problems with human rights’ implementation and thus need “some sort of protection.” Over 21 million people are in urgent need of “humanitarian assistance,” according to UN World Food Program (WFP) statistics.

“And there’s another 2.9 million living in acutely affected areas, who require legal and other types of support. Some of them are related to being displacement, some of it related to gender-based violence,” McGoldrick added.

Read more 'No food, no medicine, no money’: Yemeni town faces mass death by starvation

However, “legal type of support” might be actually not the most urgent need for Yemenis, since 7.6 million people are “severely food insecure” according to UN’s own statistics.

RT’s Arabic-language crew recently visited the district of Tuhayat on the Red Sea coast, one of these “acutely affected areas.” Most people there, including children, are starving, since the Saudi-led international coalition blockaded the coastal area and deprived the locals from fishing, which was their main source of food, coupled with a an absence of medical care.

The new UN revelations documenting the scale of the humanitarian disaster unfolding in Yemen, came as UN Special Envoy to Yemen, Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed, arrived in the southern city of Aden, the temporary capital of the government of president Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi, who was reinstated by the Saudi-led intervention.

The UN envoy was expected to present a new peace plan to Hadi on Monday, according to a spokesman. Previous peace efforts failed, since Hadi urged the Houthis rebels to withdraw from all cities and lay down the arms, while the rebels are pressing for a political deal.

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Haiti: UN Agencies Call for Urgent Food Aid

Around 800,000 people in Haiti need urgent food aid after the devastation of Hurricane Mathew, according to an emergency assessment by UN agencies.

Miguel Barreto, the regional director of the World Food Programme (WFP) for Latin America and the Caribbean, warned of the need for funds to continue food distribution and, 'help the 800,000 people who urgently need food aid.'

'The winter planting season is approaching fast. Agricultural producers have lost everything. If we do not act now to provide grains, fertilizers and other materials they need, they will not be able to plant and then will face persistent food insecurity,' said NathanaÃ'l Hishamunda, the Representative of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) in Haiti.

Haiti urgently needs $56 million dollars to ensure food aid for the population affected by Matthew during the next three months.

The National Coordinator of Food Safety has also urged effective response coordination through institutional mechanisms and the establishment of a good monitoring, evaluation and consultation system to allow consistency, transparency and efficiency.

A week after the hurricane, the government of Haiti, the CNSA, WFP and FAO conducted an evaluation of the damages.

The report resulting from it also refers to the need to provide food and basic livelihood to 1.4 million Haitians who have lost everything as a result of hurricane.

According to a emergency statement posted on the WFP website, crops in the country were virtually wiped out, about 50 percent of livestock was lost in some areas, food stores suffered serious damage, and the availability of local products has now been reduced to fruits.

In addition, on the southern coast of Haiti, fishing activities have been paralyzed because floods which destroyed nets, traps, boats, engines and all the fishermen need to work.

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UN: One in Nine People in the World Goes Hungry

ROME – The number of hungry people worldwide has fallen by more than 100 million in the last decade, but close to 805 million, or one in every nine people on earth, still does not have enough to eat.

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